Tilton River

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Tilton River
FEMA - 40060 - Tilton River in Washington.jpg
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Location of the mouth of Tilton River in Washington
Location
Country United States
State Washington
County Lewis
Physical characteristics
Source Gifford Pinchot National Forest
  locationnorth of Morton
  coordinates 46°39′23″N122°13′44″W / 46.65639°N 122.22889°W / 46.65639; -122.22889 [1]
  elevation3,035 ft (925 m) [2]
Mouth Cowlitz River
  location
Lake Mayfield
  coordinates
46°33′09″N122°32′04″W / 46.55250°N 122.53444°W / 46.55250; -122.53444 Coordinates: 46°33′09″N122°32′04″W / 46.55250°N 122.53444°W / 46.55250; -122.53444 [1]
  elevation
427 ft (130 m) [1]
Length29 mi (47 km) [3]
Basin size154 sq mi (400 km2) [4]
Discharge 
  locationCinebar, Washington
  average979.8 cuft/s [5]
  minimum50 cuft/s
  maximum1,200 cuft/s

The Tilton River is a tributary of the Cowlitz River, in the U.S. state of Washington. Named for territorial surveyor James Tilton, [6] it flows for about 29 miles (47 km), entirely within Lewis County. [3]

Contents

Course

The Tilton River originates in the Cascade Range just north of Mount St. Helens and southwest of Mount Rainier. It flows south and west, joining the Cowlitz River in Lake Mayfield, near Mossyrock. [3]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Tilton River". Geographic Names Information System (GNIS). United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved January 27, 2013.
  2. Source elevation derived from Google Earth search using GNIS source coordinates.
  3. 1 2 3 United States Geological Survey. "United States Topographic Map". TopoQuest. Retrieved January 27, 2013. River miles are marked and numbered on the relevant map quadrangles.
  4. Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board (2006). "GraysElochman and Cowlitz Watershed Management Plan" (PDF). Cowlitz County. p. 55 (section 4). Retrieved January 28, 2013.[ permanent dead link ]
  5. "USGS Current Conditions for USGS 14236200 TILTON RIVER AB BEAR CANYON CREEK NEAR CINEBAR, WA".
  6. Meany, Edmond S. (1923). Origin of Washington geographic names. Seattle: University of Washington Press. p. 310.