Tim Bruxner

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  1. 1 2 3 4 5 "In Father's Footsteps...doing the job where you can't please everyone". Sydney Morning Herald 8 February 1976 pg 64.
  2. 1 2 3 "The Hon. James Caird Bruxner". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 11 May 2019.
  3. World War II Nominal Roll: BRUXNER, JAMES CAIRD – Army Service
  4. World War II Nominal Roll: BRUXNER, JAMES CAIRD – RAAF Service
  5. Hagan, Jim (2006). People and Politics in Regional New South Wales: 1856 to the 1950s. p. 151.
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 Green, Antony. "Elections for Tenterfield". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 2 July 2020.
  7. 1 2 Davey, Paul (2006). The Nationals: the Progressive, Country, and National Party in New South Wales 1919–2006. p. 236.
  8. "Opposition Shadow Ministries from 1973". Parliament of New South Wales. Archived from the original on 16 September 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2010.
  9. Davey, Paul (2006). The Nationals: the Progressive, Country, and National Party in New South Wales 1919–2006. p. 271.
  10. Bramston, Troy (2006). The Wran era. p. 26.
  11. "No. 46961". The London Gazette . 13 July 1976. p. 9604.
  12. "In Memoriam – Tim Bruxner". National Party of Australia – NSW. 30 August 2017.

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Tim Bruxner
Minister for Transport
Minister for Highways
In office
23 January 1976 14 May 1976
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by Member for Tenterfield
1962–1981
District abolished
Political offices
Preceded by Minister for Housing
1973
Succeeded by
Minister for Co-operative Societies
1973
Preceded by Minister for Decentralisation and Development
1973–1976
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Tourism
1975–1976
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Transport
1976
Succeeded by
Minister for Highways
1976
Party political offices
Preceded by Deputy Leader of the New South Wales National Country Party
1975–1981
Succeeded by