Tim Rieder

Last updated

Tim Rieder
Personal information
Date of birth (1993-09-03) 3 September 1993 (age 30)
Place of birth Dachau, Germany
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Position(s) Defensive midfielder
Team information
Current team
1860 Munich
Number 6
Youth career
1999–2000 ASV Dachau
2000–2010 Bayern Munich
2010–2012 FC Augsburg
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
2012–2014 FC Augsburg II 132 (4)
2014–2020 FC Augsburg 5 (0)
2018Śląsk Wrocław (loan) 13 (0)
2018–2019Darmstadt 98 (loan) 15 (0)
2019–20201860 Munich (loan) 25 (3)
2020–2021 1. FC Kaiserslautern 36 (0)
2021–2022 Türkgücü München 28 (0)
2022– 1860 Munich 42 (2)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals, correct as of 19 February 2024

Tim Rieder (German pronunciation: [ˈʁiːdɐ] ; born 3 September 1993) is a German professional footballer who plays as a defensive midfielder for 3. Liga club 1860 Munich. [1]

Contents

Career

In August 2020, Rieder joined 1. FC Kaiserslautern on a three-year contract. [2]

On 8 July 2021, Rieder signed with 3. Liga club Türkgücü München. [3] He made his competitive debut for the club on 25 August in the season opener against SC Verl which ended in a 0–0 draw. [4] He made a total of 31 appearances for the club in which he failed to score. [5]

Rieder returned to his former club 1860 Munich on 16 May 2022, after Türkgücü München had filed for insolvency. [6] On 23 July, he made his return debut for the club on the opening day of the 2022–23 season, also scoring his first goal for the club in a 4–3 away victory against Dynamo Dresden. [7] He then played the entire match in a 3–0 loss to Borussia Dortmund in the first round of the DFB-Pokal. [8]

Career statistics

As of match played 16 September 2022 [5]
Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
ClubSeasonLeagueNational CupOtherTotal
DivisionAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoalsAppsGoals
FC Augsburg II 2012–13 Regionalliga Bayern 2801 [lower-alpha 1] 0290
2013–14 Regionalliga Bayern300300
2014–15 Regionalliga Bayern282282
2015–16 Regionalliga Bayern2712 [lower-alpha 1] 0291
2016–17 Regionalliga Bayern100100
2017–18 Regionalliga Bayern9191
Total1324301354
FC Augsburg 2016–17 Bundesliga 500050
Śląsk Wrocław (loan) 2017–18 Ekstraklasa 1300000130
Darmstadt 98 (loan) 2018–19 2. Bundesliga 1502000170
1860 Munich (loan) 2019–20 3. Liga 253001 [lower-alpha 2] 0263
1. FC Kaiserslautern 2020–21 3. Liga360101 [lower-alpha 3] 0380
Türkgücü München 2021–22 3. Liga280202 [lower-alpha 2] 0310
1860 Munich 2022–23 3. Liga71101 [lower-alpha 2] 091
Career total261860802758
  1. 1 2 Appearance in Regionalliga Bayern relegation play-offs
  2. 1 2 3 Appearances in Bavarian Cup
  3. Appearances in Southwestern Cup

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References

  1. "Tim Rieder". worldfootball.net. HEIM:SPIEL. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  2. "Tim Rieder verlässt den Augsburg Richtung 1. FC Kaiserslautern". kicker (in German). 21 August 2020. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  3. "Nach einem Jahr beim FCK: Rieder wechselt zu Türkgücü". kicker (in German). 8 July 2021. Retrieved 18 September 2022.
  4. "Viermal Aluminum: Verl und Türkgücü treffen das Tor nicht". kicker (in German). 25 August 2021. Retrieved 18 September 2022.
  5. 1 2 "T. Rieder: Summary". Soccerway. Perform Group. Retrieved 19 January 2018.
  6. "Rieder kehrt zu 1860 München zurück". kicker (in German). 16 May 2022. Retrieved 18 September 2022.
  7. "Sieben-Tore-Spektakel: 1860 gewinnt Auftaktspiel in Dresden". kicker (in German). 23 July 2022. Retrieved 18 September 2022.
  8. "Borussia Dortmund see off 1860 Munich challenge to advance in DFB Cup". bundesliga.com – the official Bundesliga website. 29 July 2022. Retrieved 18 September 2022.