Tim Taylor (ice hockey coach)

Last updated

Tim Taylor
Biographical details
Born(1942-03-26)March 26, 1942
Boston, Massachusetts
DiedApril 27, 2013(2013-04-27) (aged 71)
Branford, Connecticut
Playing career
1960–1963 Harvard
Position(s) Center
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1969–1976 Harvard (assistant)
1976–1983 Yale
1984 US Olympic Team (assistant)
1984–1993 Yale
1989 Team USA
1991 Team USA
1994 US Olympic Team
1994–2006 Yale
2008 Team USA (assistant)
2010 Team USA (assistant)
Head coaching record
Overall337–433–55
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
ECAC Regular Season Championship (1998)
Awards
1987 ECAC Hockey Coach of the Year
1992 ECAC Hockey Coach of the Year
1998 ECAC Hockey Coach of the Year
1998 Spencer Penrose Award

Tim Taylor (March 26, 1942 April 27, 2013) was an American ice hockey head coach. He was born Timothy Blake Taylor in Boston, Massachusetts and grew up in South Natick, Massachusetts. He was the long-time head coach of the Yale Bulldogs from 1976-77 until his retirement in 2005-06 season. [1] He twice took leaves of absence from his collegiate duties to coach the US Olympic Team (1984 and 1994) as well as serving as Team USA's head coach for the 1989 World Ice Hockey Championships and the 1991 Canada Cup. At the time of his retirement Taylor had served as Yale's head ice hockey coach for longer than anyone else, earning more wins (337) and losses (433) for the Bulldogs than all others. [2] The respect Taylor had earned over his career was exemplified by ECAC Hockey renaming its annual coaches award in his honor shortly after his retirement [3] as well as the NCAA renaming its national rookie-of-the-Year award after him a few months after his death. [4] In 2015 he was posthumously awarded the Legends of College Hockey Award, by the Hobey Baker Memorial Award Committee. [5]

Contents

Career

Player

Tim Taylor began his collegiate hockey career as a center for Harvard eventually rising to become captain in his senior season and leading the Crimson to its first ECAC regular season and conference tournament championships in 1963. After graduating with a degree in English, [6] Taylor sought a spot on the 1964 US Olympic Team to defend its first Gold medal, but was ultimately cut from the roster shortly before the games began. After the disappointment, Taylor joined the Waterloo Blackhawks of the USHL (then a semi-professional league), suiting up for them from 1964 thru 1969, excluding a brief stint for the 1965 US National Team and the Warroad Lakers later that year. During the 1968–69 season, Taylor made his way back to the Northeast, briefly playing for the Manchester Blackhawks of the New England Hockey League before accepting an assistant coaching position with his alma mater.

Coach

His first coaching job didn't last very long as Taylor left Harvard after the 1969-70 season to continue his playing career. Two years later he returned to coaching for good, helping the newly appointed Bill Cleary reach the frozen four in both 1974 and 1975. [7] A year later, after recording the two worst records in Yale's history, [8] Paul Lufkin [9] was relieved of his duties and Taylor was tabbed as his successor.

Behind the bench for his alma mater's arch-rival, Taylor swiftly returned Yale to respectability, shepherding the team to a winning season by his third year. Though Taylor had no postseason success through his first seven campaigns he was nonetheless invited to join Team USA's staff for the 1984 Winter Olympics. Taylor turned over his position at Yale to Mike Gilligan for the 1983-84 season to help team USA defend its second gold medal. The '84 team, however, was not able to capture the same magic as their predecessors and finished a disappointing 7th. Taylor returned to Yale the following year and the Bulldogs responded by playing two of the best years for the school since World War II posting 19- and then 20-win seasons, including Yale's first ever postseason victory in the 25th year of the ECAC Tournament. While the Bulldogs' fortunes declined after that, Taylor was asked to be the head coach for Team USA at the 1989 World Ice Hockey Championships. Once again, the Americans' had a poor showing, finishing 6th out of 8 teams. Despite the lack of international success, Taylor was behind the bench less than two years later for Team USA, this time in the 1991 Canada Cup, where the Americans had a much better fate as runners-up to the champion Canadian team.

Once again Yale's records improved after Taylor's international showing, posting winning seasons for the two years after the Canada Cup before Taylor took a second season off from Yale, this time to be the head coach of the US Olympic Team at the 1994 Winter Olympics. With Dan Poliziani standing in for him in New Haven for 1993-94. Taylor was able to get Team USA into the championship round with a 1-1-3 record, but they were soundly defeated by eventual Bronze medalist Finland in the quarterfinals. After 1994 Taylor remained exclusively with his collegiate position until his retirement. 1997-98 ended up being his best season as he earned the only regular season crown of his career and only NCAA berth (Yale lost 0–4 to Ohio State in its first game).

Though Taylor retired from his position at Yale following the 2005–06 season, he remained active in hockey, serving as an assistant coach for Team USA's under-18 squads in 2008 and 2010 as well as team manager for the World Junior Championship teams in 2011 and 2012. [10]

Taylor's health began to decline in later years and he was eventually diagnosed with cancer. He lost his fight against the disease on April 27, 2013, but not before he was able to witness Yale, the team he had coached for almost three decades, win its first national title under former assistant Keith Allain, which it was able to do two weeks before Taylor's death. [11]

Head coaching record

College

Statistics overview
SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Yale Bulldogs (ECAC Hockey)(1976–2006)
1976-77 Yale 6-18-15-17-115th
1977-78 Yale 12-13-112-13-19th
1978-79 Yale 13-12-212-9-17th ECAC Quarterfinals
1979-80 Yale 7-16-35-14-315th
1980-81 Yale 13-12-111-9-19th
1981-82 Yale 15-10-111-9-19th
1982-83 Yale 14-14-012-9-28th ECAC Quarterfinals
1984-85 Yale 19-11-113-7-15th ECAC Quarterfinals
1985-86 Yale 20-10-015-6-02nd ECAC 3rd-Place Game (Loss)
1986-87 Yale 15-12-313-9-04th ECAC 3rd-Place Game (Loss)
1987-88 Yale 6-20-06-16-010th
1988-89 Yale 11-19-110-12-07th ECAC Quarterfinals
1989-90 Yale 8-20-16-15-110th
1990-91 Yale 11-16-29-11-2t-8th ECAC Quarterfinals
1991-92 Yale 13-7-711-4-74th ECAC Quarterfinals
1992-93 Yale 15-12-412-7-35th ECAC Quarterfinals
1994-95 Yale 8-17-36-13-312th
1995-96 Yale 7-23-14-17-112th
1996-97 Yale 10-19-36-14-210th ECAC Quarterfinals
1997-98 Yale 23-9-317-4-11st NCAA Regional Quarterfinals
1998-99 Yale 13-14-411-7-4t-5th ECAC First Round
1999-00 Yale 9-16-56-11-49th ECAC First Round
2000-01 Yale 14-6-110-11-18th ECAC First Round
2001-02 Yale 10-19-29-11-2t-9th ECAC First Round
2002-03 Yale 18-14-013-9-04th ECAC Quarterfinals
2003-04 Yale 12-19-010-12-07th ECAC First Round
2004-05 Yale 5-25-23-18-112th ECAC First Round
2005-06 Yale 10-20-36-14-211th ECAC Quarterfinals
Yale:337-433-55264-308-45
Total:337-433-55

      National champion        Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion        Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion      Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Awards and honors

AwardYear
All-ECAC Hockey First Team 1961–62
1962–63
[12]
ECAC Hockey All-Tournament First Team 1962 [13]
ECAC Hockey All-Tournament Second Team 1963 [13]

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References

  1. "Tim Taylor Year-By-Year Coaching Record". USCHO.com. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  2. "Tim Taylor". Yale Bulldogs. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  3. "ECAC Hockey Loses Legendary Coach". Union Athletics. April 28, 2013. Retrieved August 4, 2013.
  4. "National top rookie award renamed in honor of the late Tim Taylor". USCHO.com. June 10, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  5. "Hobey Baker Memorial Award Foundation - Tim Taylor Named Hobey Baker Legend of College Hockey". www.hobeybaker.com. Archived from the original on March 11, 2015. Retrieved June 6, 2022.
  6. "Tim Taylor, Yale and '94 Olympic Coach, Dies at 71". New York Times. April 29, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  7. "Harvard Men's Hockey Team History". USCHO.com. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  8. "Yale Men's Hockey Team History". USCHO.com. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  9. "Paul Lufkin Year-By-Year Coaching Record". USCHO.com. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  10. "Tim Taylor". eliteprospects.com. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  11. "Yale Men's Ice Hockey, 2013 NCAA Champions". Yale Bulldogs. April 13, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2014.
  12. "All-ECAC Hockey Teams". College Hockey Historical Archive. Retrieved May 12, 2014.
  13. 1 2 "All-Tournament Honors" (PDF). ECAC Hockey. Retrieved May 12, 2014.
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Award Created
Mark Morris
Stan Moore
Tim Taylor Award
1986–87
1991–92
1997–98
Succeeded by
Preceded by Spencer Penrose Award
1997–98
Succeeded by
Preceded by Hobey Baker Legends of College Hockey Award
2015
Succeeded by