Timanophon

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Timanophon
Temporal range: Early Triassic, 249–247  Ma
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Scientific classification OOjs UI icon edit-ltr.svg
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Clade: Parareptilia
Order: Procolophonomorpha
Family: Procolophonidae
Subfamily: Procolophoninae
Genus: Timanophon
Novikov, 1991
Type species
Timanophon raridentatus
Novikov, 1991

Timanophon is an extinct genus of procolophonine procolophonid parareptile from early Triassic deposits of Arkhangelsk, Russia. It is known from the holotype PIN 3359/11, a partial skeleton including nearly complete skull and lower jaw which was previously referred to Burtensia sp. by Ivakhnenko in 1975. It was collected in the Mezenskaya Pizhma and Lower Syamzhen'ga localities from the Pizhmomezenskoi Formation. Ten additional specimens from the same localities are PIN 3359/1-3, 3359/63-65 and 4364/35-38. The fragmentary dentaries PIN 3360/1-3 were collected in the Vybor River locality, from the same formation. All specimens came from the Ustmylian Gorizont, dating to the early Olenekian faunal stage of the Early Triassic, about 249-247  million years ago. It was first named by I. V. Novikov in 1991 and the type species is Timanophon raridentatus. [1]

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References

  1. I. V. Novikov (1991). "Novye Dannye po Prokolofoninam SSSR [New data on Procolophonines of the USSR]". Paleontologicheskii Zhurnal. 1991 (2): 73–85.