Timeline of Curitiba

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Curitiba, Paraná (state), Brazil.

Contents

Prior to 20th century

20th century

21st century

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Tabela 1.6 - População nos Censos Demográficos, segundo os municípios das capitais - 1872/2010", Sinopse do Censo Demografico 2010 (in Portuguese), Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística , retrieved 5 September 2018
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 "History of the City". Portal de Prefeitura de Curitiba. Retrieved 30 December 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 "Brazil: Directory". Europa World Year Book 2003. Europa Publications. 2003. ISBN   978-1-85743-227-5.
  4. "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1955. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations.
  5. World Bank 2010.
  6. Frontline 2003.
  7. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1976). "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1975. New York. pp. 253–279.
  8. 1 2 3 4 Lubow 2007.
  9. "How Curitiba's BRT stations sparked a transport revolution", The Guardian , A history of cities in 50 buildings, UK, 2015
  10. "Garden Search: Brazil". London: Botanic Gardens Conservation International . Retrieved 30 June 2015.
  11. "Curitiba Journal: The Road To Rio", New York Times, 28 May 1992
  12. United Nations Department for Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis, Statistics Division (1997). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1995 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 262–321.{{cite book}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  13. "2010 census". Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística. 2010.
This article incorporates information from the Portuguese Wikipedia.

Bibliography

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Coordinates: 25°25′00″S49°15′00″W / 25.416667°S 49.25°W / -25.416667; -49.25