Timeline of Düsseldorf

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The following is a timeline of the history of Düsseldorf, Germany.

Contents

Prior to 19th century

19th century

Palace ruins after the 1872 fire Duesseldorfer-Schloss-Ruine 1870.jpg
Palace ruins after the 1872 fire

20th century

Dusseldorf at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries Duesseldorf 1900.jpg
Düsseldorf at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries
Concentration camp for Romani people in 1937 Bundesarchiv Bild 146-2006-0003, Dusseldorf, Internierungslager fur Sinti und Roma.jpg
Concentration camp for Romani people in 1937

21st century

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 Hermann Tallau (2008). "Alteste (100) Schützenvereinigungen 799-1392". Ein Kaleidoskop zum Schützenwesen (in German). Duderstadt: Mecke Druck und Verlag. ISBN   978-3-936617-85-6.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Britannica 1910.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "Düsseldorf", The Rhine from Rotterdam to Constance, Leipsic: Karl Baedeker, 1882, OCLC   7416969
  4. 1 2 "Düsseldorf", A Handbook for Travellers on the Continent (17th ed.), London: J. Murray, 1871, OCLC   5358857, OL   6936276M
  5. 1 2 3 Karl Stieler (1903), "From Dusseldorf to the Dutch Frontier", The Rhine from its source to the sea, London: William Glaisher, OL   14039550M
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "Düsseldorf", The Rhine, including the Black Forest & the Vosges, Leipzig: Karl Baedeker, 1911, OCLC   21888483
  7. "Düsseldorf", Bradshaw's Illustrated Hand-book for Belgium and the Rhine; and Portions of Rhenish Germany, London: W.J. Adams & Sons, 1897
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  9. 1 2 Cecelia Hopkins Porter (1989). "The Reign of the "Dilettanti": Düsseldorf from Mendelssohn to Schumann". Musical Quarterly. 73.
  10. Lowell Mason (1854), "Great Musical Festival at Dusseldorf", Musical letters from abroad: including detailed accounts of the Birmingham, Norwich, and Dusseldorf musical festivals of 1852, New York: Mason Brothers
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  12. Colin Lawson, ed. (2003). "Orchestras Founded in the 19th Century (chronological list)". Cambridge Companion to the Orchestra. Cambridge University Press. ISBN   978-0-521-00132-8.
  13. "Galerie Paffrath" . Retrieved January 3, 2013.
  14. Americana 1918.
  15. Stadtbuchereien Ladeshauptstadt Düsseldorf. "Geschichte der Stadtbüchereien".
  16. Chałupczak, Henryk (2004). "Powstanie i działalność polskich placówek konsularnych w okresie międzywojennym (ze szczególnym uwzględnieniem pogranicza polsko-niemiecko-czechosłowackiego)". In Kaczmarek, Ryszard; Masnyk, Marek (eds.). Konsulaty na pograniczu polsko-niemieckim i polsko-czechosłowackim w 1918–1939 (in Polish). Katowice: Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Śląskiego. p. 20.
  17. "Lager für Sinti und Roma Düsseldorf". Bundesarchiv.de (in German). Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  18. 1 2 3 "Düsseldorf (Kalkum)". aussenlager-buchenwald.de (in German). Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  19. 1 2 3 "Düsseldorf ("Berta")". aussenlager-buchenwald.de (in German). Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  20. 1 2 3 "Düsseldorf (DESt)". aussenlager-buchenwald.de (in German). Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  21. 1 2 "Düsseldorf ("Berta II")". aussenlager-buchenwald.de (in German). Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  22. "March 24-April 6, 1947". Chronology of International Events and Documents. London: Royal Institute of International Affairs. 3. 1947. JSTOR   40545021.
  23. Catherine C. Fraser; Dierk O. Hoffman (2006), Pop Culture Germany, ABC-Clio, ISBN   9781851097388, OL   9491197M, 1851097384
  24. "O nas". Instytut Polski w Dusseldorfie (in Polish). Retrieved 8 August 2022.
  25. "History". Museum Kunstpalast. Archived from the original on December 29, 2012. Retrieved January 3, 2013.

Bibliography

in English

in other languages

  • Nicolas de Pigage (1781), La Galerie électorale, de Dusseldorff, ou, Catalogue raisonné de ses tableaux (in French), Bruxelles: J.B. Jorez, OL   24342357M