Timeline of Lübeck

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Lübeck , Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

Contents

Prior to 13th century

13th–15th centuries

16th–18th centuries

19th century

Battle of Lubeck Schlacht um Lubeck 1806 - Markt.jpg
Battle of Lübeck

20th century

Lubeck at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries Luebeck Hafen 2 1900.jpg
Lübeck at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries

21st century

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Pauli & Ashworth 1911.
  2. 1 2 Knight 1866.
  3. "Chronology of Catholic Dioceses: Germany". Norway: Oslo katolske bispedømme (Oslo Catholic Diocese). Retrieved 30 September 2015.
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  5. 1 2 3 Townsend 1867.
  6. Hirsch 1906.
  7. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Chambers 1901.
  8. Bau- und Kunstdenkmäler der Freien und Hansestadt Lübeck [Architecture and monuments of the Hanseatic City of Lübeck] (in German). Vol. 2. Lübeck: Bernhard Nöhring. 1906.
  9. 1 2 3 4 5 Murray 1877.
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  11. Rhiman A. Rotz (1977). "The Lübeck Uprising of 1408 and the Decline of the Hanseatic League". Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society. 121 (1): 1–45. JSTOR   986565.
  12. Wilhelm Sandermann (2013). "Beginn der Papierherstellung in einigen Landern". Papier: Eine spannende Kulturgeschichte (in German). Springer-Verlag. ISBN   978-3-662-09193-7. (timeline)
  13. Elina Gertsman (2003). "The Dance of Death in Reval (Tallinn)". Gesta. 42. JSTOR   25067083.
  14. Robert Proctor (1898). "Books Printed From Types: Germany: Lubeck". Index to the Early Printed Books in the British Museum. London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Company. hdl:2027/uc1.c3450631 via HathiTrust.
  15. 1 2 3 Hoffmann 1908.
  16. George Grove, ed. (1879). A Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Vol. 1. London: Macmillan.
  17. 1 2 New York Times 2011.
  18. Georg Friedrich Kolb (1862). "Deutschland: Lubeck". Grundriss der Statistik der Völkerzustands- und Staatenkunde (in German). Leipzig: A. Förstnersche Buchhandlung.
  19. 1 2 "Lübeck". Neuer Theater-Almanach (in German). Berlin: F.A. Günther & Sohn. 1908. hdl:2027/uva.x030515382.
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  21. "Global Resources Network". Chicago, USA: Center for Research Libraries . Retrieved 7 December 2013.

This article incorporates information from the German Wikipedia.

Bibliography

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in German

53°52′11″N10°41′11″E / 53.869722°N 10.686389°E / 53.869722; 10.686389