Timeline of United States history (1930–49)

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This section of the Timeline of United States history concerns events from 1930 to 1949.

Contents

1930s

Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother", an iconic image of the Great Depression in United States Lange-MigrantMother02.jpg
Dorothea Lange's "Migrant Mother", an iconic image of the Great Depression in United States
Motion Picture Production Code defunct American film studio self-censorship rules

The Motion Picture Production Code was the set of industry moral guidelines that was applied to most United States motion pictures released by major studios from 1930 to 1968. It is also popularly known as the Hays Code, after Will H. Hays, who was the president of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA) from 1922 to 1945. Under Hays' leadership, the MPPDA, later known as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), adopted the Production Code in 1930, and began rigidly enforcing it in mid-1934. The Production Code spelled out what was acceptable and what was unacceptable content for motion pictures produced for a public audience in the United States.

Frozen food

Freezing food preserves it from the time it is prepared to the time it is eaten. Since early times, farmers, fishermen, and trappers have preserved grains and produce in unheated buildings during the winter season. Freezing food slows down decomposition by turning residual moisture into ice, inhibiting the growth of most bacterial species. In the food commodity industry, there are two processes: mechanical and cryogenic. The freezing kinetics is important to preserve the food quality and texture. Quicker freezing generates smaller ice crystals and maintains cellular structure. Cryogenic freezing is the quickest freezing technology available due to the ultra low liquid nitrogen temperature −196 °C (−320 °F).

Clarence Birdseye American inventor

Clarence Frank Birdseye II was an American inventor, entrepreneur, and naturalist, and is considered to be the founder of the modern frozen food industry.

1940s

The USS Arizona, aflame and sinking, on December 7, 1941 The USS Arizona (BB-39) burning after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor - NARA 195617 - Edit.jpg
The USS Arizona, aflame and sinking, on December 7, 1941
Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 enacted September 16, 1940, in preparation for the American entry into World War II

The Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, also known as the Burke–Wadsworth Act, Pub.L. 76–783, 54 Stat. 885, enacted September 16, 1940, was the first peacetime conscription in United States history. This Selective Service Act required that men who had reached their 21st birthday but had not yet reached their 36th birthday register with local draft boards. Later, when the U.S. entered World War II, all men from their 18th birthday until the day before their 45th birthday were made subject to military service, and all men from their 18th birthday until the day before their 65th birthday were required to register.

Smith Act

The Alien Registration Act, popularly known as the Smith Act, 76th United States Congress, 3d session, ch. 439, 54 Stat. 670, 18 U.S.C. § 2385 is a United States federal statute that was enacted on June 29, 1940. It set criminal penalties for advocating the overthrow of the U.S. government by force or violence and required all non-citizen adult residents to register with the federal government.

Oldsmobile car brand, originally of Olds Motor Works, and later General Motors

Oldsmobile was a brand of American automobiles produced for most of its existence by General Motors. Olds Motor Vehicle Co. was founded by Ransom E. Olds in 1897. It produced over 35 million vehicles, including at least 14 million built at its Lansing, Michigan factory. During its time as a division of General Motors, it slotted in the middle of GM's five divisions, and was noted for its testing of groundbreaking technology and designs, most notably the "Rocket V8" engine. In 1985, over 1 million Oldsmobiles were sold, but by the 1990s the division was tasked with competing with import brands. At the time of its closure in 2004, Oldsmobile was the oldest surviving American automobile marque, and one of the oldest in the world, after Peugeot, MAN and Tatra.

Related Research Articles

Scott W. Lucas American politician

Scott Wike Lucas was an American attorney and politician. A member of the Democratic Party, he represented Illinois in the U.S. House of Representatives (1935–1939) and the U.S. Senate (1939–1951). He was the Senate Majority Leader from 1948 to 1950.

This article presents a timeline of events in the history of the United Kingdom from 1930 AD until 1949 AD. For a narrative explaining the overall developments, see the related History of the British Isles.

Frank Eugene Hook American politician

Frank Eugene Hook was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

Daniel Joseph Tobin was an American labor leader and president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters from 1907 to 1952. From 1917 to 1928, he was secretary-treasurer of the American Federation of Labor. He served on the federation's Executive Council beginning in 1934, and served until his resignation in 1952.

The Middle Atlantic League was a lower-level circuit in American minor league baseball that played during the second quarter of the 20th century.

Hugh Herbert Comedian, film actor

Hugh Herbert was a motion picture comedian. He began his career in vaudeville and wrote more than 150 plays and sketches.

George Chandler American film and television actor

George Chandler was an American actor who starred in over 140 feature films, usually in smaller supporting roles, and he is perhaps best known for playing the character of Uncle Petrie Martin on the television series Lassie.

John Mills Houston American politician

John Mills Houston was a member of the United States House of Representatives from the 5th congressional district of Kansas from 1935 to 1943. He was also a member of the National Labor Relations Board from 1943 to 1953.

Joe Sawyer was a Canadian film actor. He appeared in more than 200 films between 1927 and 1962, and was sometimes billed under his birth name. He was born in Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

The Wisconsin Progressive Party (1934–1946) was a political party that briefly held a dominant role in Wisconsin politics.

Melville Shyer American film director

Melville Jacob Shyer was an American film director, screenwriter and producer and one of the founders of the Directors Guild of America. His career spanned over 50 years, during which he worked with Mack Sennett and D. W. Griffith.

Arthur Roberts July 17, 1890 – February 5, 1961), also known as Arthur E. Roberts, was an American film editor who edited over 100 films during his almost 30 year career. He began ending towards the end of the silent era of the film industry, his first film being 1927's The College Hero, directed by Walter Lang. His last film was Republic's Lay That Rifle Down in 1955, after which he spent a brief period as the editor for the television series, Lassie, before retiring in 1956. During his career he would work with many famous directors, including Frank Capra, Lowell Sherman, William Seiter, Edward Cline, George Cukor, Dorothy Arzner, Anthony Mann, George Archainbaud, Fritz Lang,

Charles Coleman (actor) American film and television actor

Charles Pearce Coleman was an Australian-born American character actor of the silent and sound film eras.

References

See also

Timeline of modern American conservatism

This timeline of modern American conservatism lists important events, developments and occurrences which have significantly affected conservatism in the United States. With the decline of the conservative wing of the Democratic Party after 1960, the movement is most closely associated with the Republican Party (GOP). Economic conservatives favor less government regulation, lower taxes and weaker labor unions while social conservatives focus on moral issues and neoconservatives focus on democracy worldwide. Conservatives generally distrust the United Nations and Europe and apart from the libertarian wing favor a strong military and give enthusiastic support to Israel.

History of the United States (1918–1945) aspect of history

The history of the United States from 1918 through 1945 covers the post-World War I era, the Great Depression, and World War II. After World War I, the U.S. rejected the Treaty of Versailles and did not join the League of Nations.