Timeline of the 2006 Atlantic hurricane season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2006 Atlantic hurricane season
2006 Atlantic hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedJune 10, 2006
Last system dissipatedOctober 2, 2006
Strongest system
Name Gordon and Helene
Maximum winds120 mph (195 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure955 mbar (hPa; 28.2 inHg)
Longest lasting system
Name Florence
Duration9 days
Storm articles
Other years
2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008

The 2006 Atlantic hurricane season was a cycle of the annual tropical cyclone season in the Atlantic Ocean in the Northern Hemisphere. The season officially began on June 1, 2006, and ended on November 30, 2006. These dates, adopted by convention, historically describe the period in each year when most subtropical or tropical cyclogenesis occurs in the Atlantic Ocean. [1] The first storm to form in 2006 was Tropical Storm Alberto on June 10; [nb 1] the last, Hurricane Isaac, dissipated on October 2.

Contents

The season saw near average activity in terms of the overall number of cyclones. [nb 2] There were ten named storms in the Atlantic basin in 2006, of which five became hurricanes with two intensifying further into major hurricanes. [nb 3] It was the first season since the 2001 season in which no hurricanes made landfall in the United States, and the first since the 1994 season that no tropical cyclones formed during October; activity was slowed by a rapidly forming El Niño event in 2006, the presence of the Saharan Air Layer over the tropical Atlantic, and the steady presence of a robust secondary high-pressure area to the Azores High centered on Bermuda. [5]

This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season. It includes information that was not released throughout the season, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as a storm that was not initially warned upon, has been included.

By convention, meteorologists use one time zone when issuing forecasts and making observations: Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), and also use the 24-hour clock (where 00:00 = midnight UTC). [6] The National Hurricane Center uses both UTC and the time zone where the center of the tropical cyclone is currently located. The time zones utilized (east to west) are: Greenwich, Cape Verde, Atlantic, Eastern, and Central. [7] In this timeline, all information is listed by UTC first, with the respective regional time zone included in parentheses. Additionally, figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 units (knots, miles, or kilometers), following National Hurricane Center practice. Direct wind observations are rounded to the nearest whole number. Atmospheric pressures are listed to the nearest millibar and nearest hundredth of an inch of mercury.

Timeline of storms

Hurricane Isaac (2006)Hurricane Helene (2006)Hurricane Gordon (2006)Hurricane Florence (2006)Hurricane Ernesto (2006)Tropical Storm Debby (2006)Tropical Storm Chris (2006)Tropical Storm Beryl (2006)Tropical Storm Alberto (2006)Saffir-Simpson scaleTimeline of the 2006 Atlantic hurricane season

June

Tropical Storm Alberto Alberto 2006-06-12 1830Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Alberto
June 1
June 10
June 13
June 14

July

July 17
July 18
July 21
July 31

August

Tropical Storm Chris 03L Chris 2006.jpg
Tropical Storm Chris
August 1
August 3
August 4
August 21
August 22
August 24
August 25
August 26
Hurricane Ernesto Hurricane ernesto 20060827.jpg
Hurricane Ernesto
August 27
August 28
August 29
August 30
August 31

September

September 1
September 3
September 5
September 10
September 11
September 12
September 13
September 16
Hurricane Helene Hurricane Helene 2006.jpg
Hurricane Helene
September 17
September 20
September 24
September 27
September 28
September 30

October

October 2

November

November 30

See also

Notes

  1. The 2006 calendar year began with an off-season system active in the basin, as the 28th and final storm of the 2005 season, Tropical Storm Zeta, persisted until early January 2006. [2]
  2. An average Atlantic hurricane season, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has fourteen tropical storms, seven hurricanes and three major hurricanes. [3]
  3. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 (wind speeds of 111 miles per hour (179 km/h)) or higher on the 5-level Saffir–Simpson wind speed scale are considered major hurricanes. [4]
  4. The figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 units (knots, miles, or kilometers), following the convention used in the National Hurricane Center's operational products for each storm. All other units are rounded to the nearest digit.

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