Timeline of the 2007–08 South Pacific cyclone season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2007-08 South Pacific cyclone season
2007-2008 South Pacific cyclone season summary.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedOctober 17, 2007
Last system dissipatedApril 19, 2008
Strongest system
Maximum winds185 km/h (115 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure925 hPa (mbar)
Longest lasting system
Name Gene
Duration10 days
Storm articles
Other years
2003–04, 2007–08, 2008–09

The 2007–08 South Pacific cyclone season was a below-average season with only four tropical cyclones, forming within the South Pacific to the east of 160°E. [A 1] The season officially ran from November 1, 2007 to April 30, 2008, although the first cyclone, Tropical Depression 01F, formed on October 17.

Contents

Within the South Pacific, tropical cyclones are monitored by the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC) in Nadi, Fiji, and the Tropical Cyclone Warning Center (TCWC) in Wellington, New Zealand. RSMC Nadi attaches an F suffix to tropical disturbances that form in or move into the South Pacific. The United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issues unofficial warnings within the South Pacific, designating tropical cyclones with a number and a P suffix. RSMC Nadi and TCWC Wellington both use the Australian Tropical Cyclone Intensity Scale, and measure wind speeds over a period of ten minutes, while the JTWC measures sustained winds over a period of one minute and uses the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale.

This timeline includes information from post-storm reviews by RSMC Nadi, TCWC Wellington and the JTWC. It documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season. Reports among warning centers often differ; as such, information from all three agencies has been included.

Timeline of storms

Severe Tropical Cyclone GeneSevere Tropical Cyclone FunaSevere Tropical Cyclone DamanTropical cyclone scales#Comparisons across basinsTimeline of the 2007-08 South Pacific cyclone season

October

October 17
1800 UTC, (0600 FST, October 17) – RSMC Nadi reports that Tropical Disturbance 01F has formed about 880 km (545 mi) to the northwest of Port Vila, Vanuatu. [1] [A 2] [A 3] [A 4]
2100 UTC, (0900 FST, October 17) – RSMC Nadi reports that Tropical Disturbance 01F has intensified into a tropical depression. [2]
October 19
0900 UTC, (2100 FST) – RSMC Nadi issues the final advisory on Tropical Depression 01F. [3]

November

Tropical Depression 02F Tropical Depression 02F.jpg
Tropical Depression 02F
Track map of Tropical Depression 03F 3-F 2007 track.png
Track map of Tropical Depression 03F
November 1
November 20
November 22
November 24
November 25
November 27
November 28
November 30

December

Severe Tropical Cyclone Daman Cyclone Daman 2007.jpeg
Severe Tropical Cyclone Daman
Track map of Severe Tropical Cyclone Daman Daman 2007 track.png
Track map of Severe Tropical Cyclone Daman
Tropical Disturbance 06F 06F2007-08.jpg
Tropical Disturbance 06F
Tropical Disturbance 06F 6-F 2007 track.png
Tropical Disturbance 06F
December 2
December 3
December 4
December 5
December 6
December 7
December 8
December 9
December 10
December 11
December 14
December 26
December 28

January

Tropical Cyclone Elisa shortly before being named Elisa 09 jan 2008 2210Z.jpg
Tropical Cyclone Elisa shortly before being named
Track map of Tropical Depression 08F 8-F 2008 track.png
Track map of Tropical Depression 08F
Tropical Depression 09F 2007-0809F.jpg
Tropical Depression 09F
Track map of Tropical Depression 09F 9-F 2008 track.png
Track map of Tropical Depression 09F
Severe Tropical Cyclone Funa Funa 18 jan 2008 2130Z.jpg
Severe Tropical Cyclone Funa
Track map of Severe Tropical Cyclone Funa Funa 2008 track.png
Track map of Severe Tropical Cyclone Funa
Tropical Depression 11F 11F2008.jpg
Tropical Depression 11F
Track map of Tropical Depression 11F 11-F 2008 track.png
Track map of Tropical Depression 11F
January 7
January 9
January 10
January 11
January 12
January 13
January 14
January 15
January 16
January 17
January 18
January 19
January 20
January 21
January 22
January 24
January 26
January 27
January 28
January 29
January 30
January 31

February

Severe Tropical Cyclone Gene Gene 2008-02-01 0200Z.jpg
Severe Tropical Cyclone Gene
Track map of Severe Tropical Cyclone Gene Gene 2008 track.png
Track map of Severe Tropical Cyclone Gene
February 1
February 2
February 3
February 4
February 6
February 9
February 17
February 18

March

Tropical Depression 14F 14F 19 mar 2008 2310Z.jpg
Tropical Depression 14F
March 19
March 20
March 21
March 22
March 23
2100 UTC, (0900 FST, March 24) – RSMC Nadi issues the final advisory on Tropical Disturbance 14F. [39]

April

Track map of Tropical Depression 15F 15-F 2008 track.png
Track map of Tropical Depression 15F
Track map of Tropical Depression 16F 27-P 2008 track.png
Track map of Tropical Depression 16F
April 4
April 7
April 17
April 18
April 19
April 30

See also

Notes

  1. An average season has nine tropical cyclones, about half of which become severe tropical cyclones.
  2. UTC stands for Coordinated Universal Time.
  3. FST stands for Fiji Standard Time, which is equivalent to UTC+12.
  4. The figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 units (knots, miles, or kilometers), following the convention used in the Fiji Meteorological Service's operational products for each storm. All other units are rounded to the nearest digit.

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