Timeline of the 2010 Pacific hurricane season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2010 Pacific hurricane season
2010 Pacific hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedMay 29, 2010
Last system dissipatedDecember 21, 2010
Strongest system
Name Celia
Maximum winds160 mph (260 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure921 mbar (hPa; 27.2 inHg)
Longest lasting system
Durationdays
Storm articles
Other years
2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012

The 2010 Pacific hurricane season was one of the least active seasons on record, featuring the fewest named storms since 1977. [1] The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific—east of 140°W—and on June 1 in the central Pacific—between the International Date Line and 140°W—and lasted until November 30. These dates typically cover the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin. [2] The season's first storm, Tropical Storm Agatha, developed on May 29; the season's final storm, Tropical Storm Omeka, degenerated on December 21.

Contents

The season began with record-breaking activity with four named storms, including two major hurricanes, developing by the end of June. [1] Accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) [nb 1] values exceeded 300 percent of the average for the month of June. [3] Activity abruptly diminished thereafter, with July, August, and September seeing record low storm development. The Eastern Pacific season proper ended with Tropical Storm Georgette's dissipation on September 23, a month before the climatological mean. [1] The year's final cyclone, Omeka, developed in the off-season on December 18, marking a record-late formation date in the satellite-era. [4] Although there were relatively few storms, the season proved exceptionally deadly and destructive. Torrential rains associated with Agatha and Eleven-E killed well over 200 people in Central America and Mexico and left more than $1.5 billion in damage. [5] [6]

Four time zones are utilized in the basin: Central for storms east of 106°W, Mountain between 114.9°W and 106°W, Pacific between 140°W and 115°W, [7] and Hawaii–Aleutian for storms between the International Date Line and 140°W. However, for convenience, all information is listed by Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) first with the respective local time included in parentheses. This timeline includes information that was not operationally released, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as the subtropical phase of Omeka, is included. This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season.

Timeline of events

Tropical Storm OmekaTropical Storm Georgette (2010)Tropical Depression Eleven-E (2010)Hurricane Frank (2010)Hurricane Celia (2010)Tropical Storm Agatha (2010)Saffir–Simpson scaleTimeline of the 2010 Pacific hurricane season

May

May 15

May 29

Damage wrought by Tropical Storm Agatha in Guatemala Tropical Storm Agatha Guatemala damage.jpg
Damage wrought by Tropical Storm Agatha in Guatemala

May 30

June

June 1

June 16

June 17

June 18

June 19

Tropical Storms Blas (left) and Celia (right) on June 19 Blas Celia jun 19 2010 1730Z.jpg
Tropical Storms Blas (left) and Celia (right) on June 19

June 20

June 21

June 22

June 23

Infrared satellite loop of Hurricane Celia intensifying on June 24 Hurricane Celia 2010 Infrared satellite loop.gif
Infrared satellite loop of Hurricane Celia intensifying on June 24

June 24

June 25

June 26

June 27

The small Hurricane Darby situated south of Mexico on June 25. Darby Jun 25 2010 1955Z.jpg
The small Hurricane Darby situated south of Mexico on June 25.

June 28

July

July 14

July 16

August

August 6

Tropical Storm Estelle at peak intensity on August 6 Estelle aug 7 2010 1810Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Estelle at peak intensity on August 6

August 8

August 9

August 10

August 20

August 21

August 22

Hurricane Frank off the coast of Mexico on August 25 Hurricane Frank 2010 off the coast of Mexico.jpg
Hurricane Frank off the coast of Mexico on August 25

August 25

August 26

August 27

August 28

September

September 3

Track of Tropical Depression Eleven-E, later Tropical Storm Hermine, stretching from the Gulf of Tehuantepec northward to the Midwestern United States Hermine 2010 track.png
Track of Tropical Depression Eleven-E, later Tropical Storm Hermine, stretching from the Gulf of Tehuantepec northward to the Midwestern United States

September 4

September 5

September 20

September 21

Tropical Storm Georgette at peak intensity on September 21 Georgette sept 21 2010.jpg
Tropical Storm Georgette at peak intensity on September 21

September 22

September 23

October

(No tropical cyclones developed in October).

November

(No tropical cyclones developed in November).

November 30

December

December 18

Subtropical Storm Omeka embedded within a larger extratropical system to the west of Hawaii on December 19. 98C dec 19 2010 0000Z.jpg
Subtropical Storm Omeka embedded within a larger extratropical system to the west of Hawaii on December 19.

December 19

December 20

December 21

See also

Footnotes

  1. Accumulated Cyclone Energy, broadly speaking, is a measure of the power of a hurricane multiplied by the length of time it existed, so storms that last a long time, as well as particularly strong hurricanes, have high ACEs.
  2. The figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 units (knots, miles, or kilometers), following the convention used in the National Hurricane Center's operational products for each storm. All other units are rounded to the nearest digit.

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