Timeline of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2013 Atlantic hurricane season
2013 Atlantic hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedJune 5, 2013
Last system dissipatedDecember 7, 2013
Strongest system
Name Humberto
Maximum winds90 mph (150 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure979 mbar (hPa; 28.91 inHg)
Longest lasting system
NameHumberto
Duration11 days
Storm articles
Other years
2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

The 2013 Atlantic hurricane season was an event in the annual hurricane season in the north Atlantic Ocean. It featured below-average tropical cyclone activity, [nb 1] with the fewest hurricanes since the 1982 season. [2] The season officially began on June 1, 2013 and ended on November 30, 2013. These dates, adopted by convention, historically delimit the period in each year when most tropical systems form. [3] The season's first storm, Tropical Storm Andrea formed on June 5, and its final storm, an unnamed subtropical storm, dissipated on December 7. Altogether, there were 13 named tropical storms during the season. Two of which attained hurricane strength, but neither intensified into a major hurricane, [nb 2] the first such occurrence since the 1994 season. [2]

Contents

Despite the season's below-average activity overall, three Atlantic storms made Landfall in Mexico, two as tropical storms and one as a hurricane. [nb 3] Hurricane Ingrid made landfall on September 15, near La Pesca, Tamaulipas, on September 15, killing 23 and causing $1.5 billion (2013 USD) in damage. That same month, on the opposite side of the country, Hurricane Manuel made multiple landfalls along Mexico's Pacific coast, causing catastrophic damage. [5] The only tropical storm to make landfall in the United States was Andrea. After coming ashore in Florida's Big Bend region, it killed at least three and brought tornadoes, heavy rainfall, and flooding to a large section of the U.S. East Coast and Atlantic Canada. [6] [7]

This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season. It includes information that was not released throughout the season, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as a storm that was not initially warned upon, has been included.

By convention, meteorologists use one time zone when issuing forecasts and making observations: Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), and also use the 24-hour clock (where 00:00 = midnight UTC). [8] The National Hurricane Center uses both UTC and the time zone where the center of the tropical cyclone is currently located. The time zones utilized (east to west) prior to 2020 were: Atlantic, Eastern, and Central. [9] In this timeline, all information is listed by UTC first with the respective regional time included in parentheses. Additionally, figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 units (knots, miles, or kilometers), following the convention used in the National Hurricane Center's products. Direct wind observations are rounded to the nearest whole number. Atmospheric pressures are listed to the nearest millibar and nearest hundredth of an inch of mercury.

Timeline

Tropical Storm Karen (2013)Hurricane IngridTropical Storm Fernand (2013)Tropical Storm Chantal (2013)Tropical Storm Barry (2013)Tropical Storm Andrea (2013)Saffir–Simpson scaleTimeline of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season

June

June 1

June 5

Tropical Storm Andrea prior to landfall on June 6 Andrea Jun 6 2013 1845Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Andrea prior to landfall on June 6

June 6

June 7

June 17

June 19

June 20

June 21

July

July 7

Tropical Storm Chantal in the central Atlantic on July 8 Tropical Storm Chantal 2013-07-08 1945Z.png
Tropical Storm Chantal in the central Atlantic on July 8

July 9

July 10

July 23

July 24

July 25

July 27

August

Storm path of Tropical Storm Dorian Dorian 2013 track.png
Storm path of Tropical Storm Dorian

August 2

August 3

August 15

August 17

August 18

Tropical Depression Six near tropical storm intensity on August 25 06L Aug 25 2013 1710Z.jpg
Tropical Depression Six near tropical storm intensity on August 25

August 25

August 26

September

September 4

Storm path of Tropical Storm Gabrielle Gabrielle 2013 track.png
Storm path of Tropical Storm Gabrielle

September 4

September 5

September 6

September 7

September 8

September 9

Hurricane Humberto shortly after peak intensity on September 12 Humberto Sept 12 2013 1510Z.jpg
Hurricane Humberto shortly after peak intensity on September 12

September 10

September 11

September 12

September 13

Ingrid shortly before becoming a hurricane on September 14 Ingrid Sept 14 2013 1645Z.jpg
Ingrid shortly before becoming a hurricane on September 14

September 14

September 15

September 16

September 17

September 18

September 19

Storm path of Tropical Storm Jerry Jerry 2013 track.png
Storm path of Tropical Storm Jerry

September 29

September 30

October

October 1

A disorganized Tropical Storm Karen on October 3 Karen Oct 3 2013 1845Z.jpg
A disorganized Tropical Storm Karen on October 3

October 3

October 6

October 21

October 22

October 24

November

Storm path of Tropical Storm Melissa Melissa 2013 track.png
Storm path of Tropical Storm Melissa

November 18

November 20

November 21

November 22

November 30

December

December 5

December 7

See also

Notes

  1. An average Atlantic hurricane season, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has 12 tropical storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes. [1]
  2. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 (wind speeds of 111 miles per hour (179 km/h)) or higher on the 5-level Saffir–Simpson wind speed scale are considered major hurricanes. [4]
  3. Additionally, five eastern Pacific storms made Landfall in Mexico during the season, three as tropical storms and two as hurricanes. [2]

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