Timeline of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2014 Atlantic hurricane season
2014 Atlantic hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedJuly 1, 2014
Last system dissipatedOctober 28, 2014
Strongest system
Name Gonzalo
Maximum winds145 mph (230 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure940 mbar (hPa; 27.76 inHg)
Longest lasting system
NameEdouard
Duration8 days
Storm articles
Other years
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

The 2014 Atlantic hurricane season was an event in the annual hurricane season in the north Atlantic Ocean. It featured below-average tropical cyclone activity, [nb 1] with the fewest named storms since the 1997 season. [2] The season officially began on June 1, 2014 and ended on November 30, 2014. These dates, adopted by convention, historically describe the period in each year when most tropical systems form. [3] Even so, there were no named storms during either the opening or closing months of the season, as the first, Hurricane Arthur, developed on July 1, and the last, Tropical Storm Hanna, dissipated on October 28.

Contents

Altogether, eight tropical storms formed during the season, including six hurricanes of which two intensified into major hurricanes. [nb 2] There was also one tropical depression that failed to reach tropical storm strength. Impact throughout the year was widespread. Arthur, which made landfall near Cape Lookout, North Carolina on July 3, with 100 mph (155 km/h) winds, was the strongest hurricane to strike the U.S. mainland since Hurricane Ike in 2008 (with 110 mph (175 km/h) winds). [2] The deadliest Atlantic storm of the season, Cristobal, barely touched land at all as it moved from Puerto Rico to Iceland in late August. Even so, it was responsible for at least seven fatalities: four on Hispaniola, one on Providenciales, and two along the U.S. East Coast. [2] In October, Bermuda was struck twice, as hurricanes Fay and Gonzalo made landfall only six days apart (October 12 and 18 respectively), leaving much damage in their wakes. [2]

This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season. It includes information that was not released throughout the season, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center, such as a storm that was not initially warned upon, has been included.

By convention, meteorologists use one time zone when issuing forecasts and making observations: Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), and also use the 24-hour clock (where 00:00 = midnight UTC). [5] The National Hurricane Center uses both UTC and the time zone where the center of the tropical cyclone is currently located. The time zones utilized (east to west) prior to 2020 were: Atlantic, Eastern, and Central. [6] In this timeline, all information is listed by UTC first with the respective regional time included in parentheses. Additionally, figures for maximum sustained winds and position estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 units (knots, miles, or kilometers), following the convention used in the National Hurricane Center's products. Direct wind observations are rounded to the nearest whole number. Atmospheric pressures are listed to the nearest millibar and nearest hundredth of an inch of mercury.

Timeline

Hurricane GonzaloHurricane FayTropical Storm Dolly (2014)Hurricane CristobalHurricane Bertha (2014)Hurricane ArthurSaffir–Simpson scaleTimeline of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season

June

June 1

July

July 1

Hurricane Arthur nearing landfall in North Carolina on July 3 Arthur Jul 3 2014 1615Z.jpg
Hurricane Arthur nearing landfall in North Carolina on July 3

July 3

July 4

July 5

July 21

July 23

August

August 1

August 3

Hurricane Bertha northeast of the Bahamas on August 4 Bertha Aug 4 2014 1750Z.jpg
Hurricane Bertha northeast of the Bahamas on August 4

August 4

August 5

August 6

August 23

August 24

August 26

Hurricane Cristobal near peak intensity east of the Carolinas on August 28 Cristobal Aug 28 2014 1530Z.jpg
Hurricane Cristobal near peak intensity east of the Carolinas on August 28

August 29

September

September 1

September 2

September 3

Map plotting the track and the intensity of Edouard (starting at lower right corner) Edouard 2014 track.png
Map plotting the track and the intensity of Edouard (starting at lower right corner)

September 11

September 12

September 14

September 15

September 16

September 17

September 19

October

October 10

October 11

Hurricane Fay over the Atlantic Ocean on October 12 Fay Oct 12 2014 1455Z.jpg
Hurricane Fay over the Atlantic Ocean on October 12

October 12

October 13

October 14

October 15

Hurricane Gonzalo at peak intensity over the Atlantic Ocean on October 16 Gonzalo Oct 16 2014 1745Z.jpg
Hurricane Gonzalo at peak intensity over the Atlantic Ocean on October 16

October 16

October 17

October 18

October 19

Map plotting the track and the intensity of Hanna (starting at center left) Hanna 2014 track.png
Map plotting the track and the intensity of Hanna (starting at center left)

October 22

October 23

October 25

October 26

October 27

October 28

November

November 30

See also

Notes

  1. An average Atlantic hurricane season, as defined by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, has 12 tropical storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes. [1]
  2. Hurricanes reaching Category 3 (111 mph /178 km/h) and higher on the 5-level Saffir–Simpson wind speed scale are considered major hurricanes. [4]
  3. Gonzalo was absorbed by a cold front several hundred nautical miles south-southwest of Iceland on October 20. The extratropical storm complex incorporating Gonzalo's remnants generated strong wind, heavy rain and snow across Ireland, the United Kingdom, and portions of Europe on October 21–22. [15] [17]

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