Timeline of the 2015 Pacific typhoon season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2015 Pacific typhoon season
2015 Pacific typhoon season summary.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedJanuary 2, 2015
Last system dissipatedDecember 23, 2015
Strongest system
Name Soudelor
Maximum winds215 km/h (130 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure900 hPa (mbar)
Longest lasting system
Name Nangka
Duration16 days
Storm articles
Other years
2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2015 Pacific typhoon season. Most of the tropical cyclones formed between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. This area, called the Western Pacific basin, is the responsibility of the Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA). They host and operate the Regional Specialized Meteorological Center (RSMC), located in Tokyo. The Japanese Meteorological Agency (JMA) is also responsible for assigning names to all tropical storms that are formed within the basin. However, any storm that enters or forms in the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) will be named (or renamed) by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) using a local name. Also of note - the Western Pacific basin is monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), which gives all Tropical depressions a number with a "W" suffix.

Contents

During the season, a total of 36 systems were designated as Tropical Depressions, as determined by the following Meteorological organizations: the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA); the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA); the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC); or one of various other reporting agencies, such as the China Meteorological Administration, or the Hong Kong Observatory. Throughout the 2015 season, 13 systems entered or formed in the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), with six of them making landfall directly over the Philippines.

The first five months of the season were unusually active and intense due to a developing El Niño. Mekkhala became an early-forming storm of the season and affected the Philippines. Typhoon Higos formed a month after Mekkhala, reaching its peak intensity as a Category 4 typhoon. Higos broke the record as the most intense storm and the easternmost forming storm within the basin during the month of February until Typhoon Wutip in 2019. During the end of next month, Typhoon Maysak reached its peak intensity as a Category 5 super typhoon with a minimum pressure of 910 millibars, which became the strongest typhoon before the month of April, however Noul became the strongest in terms of windspeeds two months after. In additional, when Dolphin was named on May 9, it became the earliest seventh named storm to form within the basin since 1971. So far this year, ten typhoons underwent rapid deepening.

Timeline

Typhoon MelorTyphoon KoppuTyphoon MujigaeTyphoon Dujuan (2015)Tropical Storm Vamco (2015)Tropical Storm Etau (2015)Typhoon Goni (2015)Typhoon SoudelorTyphoon HalolaTyphoon Nangka (2015)Tropical Storm Linfa (2015)Typhoon Chan-hom (2015)Typhoon Dolphin (2015)Typhoon Noul (2015)Typhoon Maysak (2015)Tropical Storm Bavi (2015)Tropical Storm Mekkhala (2015)Timeline of the 2015 Pacific typhoon season

January

January 2
January 4
January 13
Mekkhala making landfall over the Philippines on January 17 Mekkhala 2015 landfall.gif
Mekkhala making landfall over the Philippines on January 17
January 14
January 15
January 16
January 17
January 18
January 21

February

February 7
February 8
February 9
Typhoon Higos undergoing rapid intensification Higos 2015 rapid deepening RBTOP.gif
Typhoon Higos undergoing rapid intensification
February 10
February 11
February 13

March

March 10
March 11
Tropical Storm Bavi at peak intensity on March 14 Bavi Mar 14 2015 0310Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Bavi at peak intensity on March 14
March 14
March 17
March 23
Track of Typhoon Maysak during late-March Maysak 2015 track.png
Track of Typhoon Maysak during late-March
March 27
March 28
March 29
March 30
March 31

April

April 1
April 2
April 3
Tropical Depression 05W intensifies into Tropical Storm Haishen on April 4 Haishen 2015-04-04 0330Z.jpg
Tropical Depression 05W intensifies into Tropical Storm Haishen on April 4
April 4
April 5
April 6
April 7

May

May 2
May 3
May 5
May 6
May 7
May 9
Typhoon Noul making landfall over the Philippines on May 10 Noul 2015 landfall.gif
Typhoon Noul making landfall over the Philippines on May 10
May 10
May 11
May 12
May 13
May 15
Typhoon Dolphin intensifying on May 16 Dolphin 2015-05-16 0530Z.png
Typhoon Dolphin intensifying on May 16
May 16
May 17
May 18
May 19
May 20

June

June 19
June 20
June 21
June 22
June 23
June 24
June 25
June 30

July

July 1
July 2
July 3
July 6
July 7
Three tropical cyclones simultaneously active in the Western Pacific; (from left to right) Linfa, Chan-hom and Nangka on July 7. 2 invests which soon to become Halola and Iune are also visible in the Central Pacific Linfa, Chan-hom, Nangka, Pre-Halola and Pre-Iune 2015-07-07 0230Z.jpg
Three tropical cyclones simultaneously active in the Western Pacific; (from left to right) Linfa, Chan-hom and Nangka on July 7. 2 invests which soon to become Halola and Iune are also visible in the Central Pacific
July 8
July 9
July 10
July 12
July 13
July 14
July 15
July 16
July 17
July 20
July 23
July 25
July 26
July 29
July 30

August

Typhoon Soudelor weakening with an eyewall replacement cycle on August 6 Soudelor 2015-08-06 0520Z.png
Typhoon Soudelor weakening with an eyewall replacement cycle on August 6
August 1
August 2
August 3
August 4
August 5
Track of Tropical Storm Molave during early-August Molave 2015 track.png
Track of Tropical Storm Molave during early-August
August 7
August 8
August 9
August 10
August 11
August 13
August 14
August 16
August 19

September

October

October 2

● Tropical Storm Kabayan (Mujigae) made landfall over the Aurora Province

October 3

● Mujigae explosively intensified into a Category 4-equivalent typhoon based on Joint Typhoon Warning Center

October 5

● Mujigae weakens into tropical depression

October 6

● Choi-wan upgraded to the typhoon category

October 7

● Choi-wan started slowly weaken and downgraded to high-end tropical storm intensity

October 8

● Choi-wan reached peak strength with minimum pressure of 955 mb and issued an final warning based on JMA.

October 11

● Area of convection persisted approximately 528 km (328 mi) just north of Pohnpei later that day JMA upgraded the system to an tropical depression


November

December

See also

Notes

  1. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center is a joint United States Navy  United States Air Force task force that issues tropical cyclone warnings for the western Pacific Ocean and other regions. [4]
  2. The Japan Meteorological Agency is the official Regional Specialized Meteorological Center for the western Pacific Ocean. [6]

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