Timeline of the 2016 Pacific typhoon season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2016 Pacific typhoon season
2016 Pacific typhoon season summary.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedMay 25, 2016
Last system dissipatedDecember 28, 2016
Strongest system
Name Meranti
Maximum winds220 km/h (140 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure890 hPa (mbar)
Longest lasting system
Name Lionrock
Duration13 days
Storm articles
Other years
2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018

This timeline documents all of the events of the 2016 Pacific typhoon season. Most of the tropical cyclones forming between May and November. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator between 100°E and the International Date Line. Tropical storms that form in the entire Western Pacific basin are assigned a name by the Japan Meteorological Agency. Tropical depressions that form in this basin are given a number with a "W" suffix by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center. In addition, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones (including tropical depressions) that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility. These names, however, are not in common use outside of the Philippines.

Contents

During the season, 50 systems were designated as tropical depressions by either, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), or other National Meteorological and Hydrological Services such as the China Meteorological Administration and the Hong Kong Observatory. As they run the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre for the Western Pacific, the JMA assigns names to tropical depressions should they intensify into a tropical storm. PAGASA also assign local names to tropical depressions which form within their area of responsibility; however, these names are not in common use outside of PAGASA's area of responsibility. In this season, 14 systems entered or formed in the Philippine area of responsibility, which 7 of them directly made landfall over the Philippines.

Timeline

Typhoon Nock-tenNovember 2016 Vietnam tropical depressionTyphoon HaimaTyphoon SarikaTropical Storm Aere (2016)Typhoon Songda (2016)Typhoon Chaba (2016)Typhoon Megi (2016)Typhoon Malakas (2016)Tropical Storm Rai (2016)Typhoon MerantiTyphoon LionrockTyphoon Mindulle (2016)Tropical Storm Dianmu (2016)Tropical Storm Nida (2016)Tropical Storm Mirinae (2016)Typhoon NepartakTimeline of the 2016 Pacific typhoon season

January

January 1

May

May 25
May 27

June

Tropical Depression Ambo nearing landfall on June 26 Ambo 2016-06-26 0550Z.jpg
Tropical Depression Ambo nearing landfall on June 26
June 25
June 26
June 27
June 28

July

July 2
July 3
July 4
July 5
Track of Nepartak during early July Nepartak 2016 track.png
Track of Nepartak during early July
July 6
July 7
July 8
July 9
July 10
July 16
July 17
July 20
July 22
July 23
July 24
July 25
July 26
July 27
July 28
July 29
July 30
July 31

August

August 1
August 2
August 3
August 4
August 5
August 6
August 7
August 8
August 9
August 12
August 13
August 14
August 15
August 16

September

October

November

December

December 31

See also

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