Timeline of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season

Last updated
2018 Pacific hurricane season
2018 Pacific hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedMay 10, 2018
Last system dissipatedNovember 5, 2018
Strongest system
NameWalaka
Maximum winds160 mph (260 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure920 mbar (hPa; 27.17 inHg)
Longest lasting system
NameSergio
Duration13.50 days
Storm articles
Other years
2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

The 2018 Pacific hurricane season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific—east of 140°W—and began on June 1 in the central Pacific—between the International Date Line and 140°W, and ended on November 30. These dates typically cover the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin. [1]

2018 Pacific hurricane season Period of formation of tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean in 2018

The 2018 Pacific hurricane season produced the highest accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) value on record in the Eastern Pacific basin. With 23 named storms, it was the fourth-most active season on record, tied with 1982. The season officially began on May 15 in the eastern Pacific, and on June 1 in the central Pacific; they both ended on November 30. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the Pacific basin, as illustrated when the first tropical depression formed on May 10.

140th meridian west

The meridian 140° west of Greenwich is a line of longitude that extends from the North Pole across the Arctic Ocean, North America, the Pacific Ocean, the Southern Ocean, and Antarctica to the South Pole.

International Date Line imaginary line that demarcates the change of one calendar day to the next

The International Date Line (IDL) is an imaginary line of demarcation on the surface of Earth that runs from the North Pole to the South Pole and demarcates the change of one calendar day to the next. It passes through the middle of the Pacific Ocean, roughly following the 180° line of longitude but deviating to pass around some territories and island groups.

Contents

Four time zones are utilized in the basin: Central for storms east of 106°W, Mountain between 114.9°W and 106°W, Pacific between 140°W and 115°W, [2] and Hawaii–Aleutian for storms between the International Date Line and 140°W. However, for convenience, all information is listed by Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) first with the respective local time included in parentheses. This timeline includes information that was not operationally released, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center is included. This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season.

A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time.

Central Time Zone time zone

The North American Central Time Zone (CT) is a time zone in parts of Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central America, some Caribbean Islands, and part of the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

Mountain Time Zone time zone of North America

The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) when standard time is in effect, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time (UTC−06:00). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time at the 105th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory. In the United States, the exact specification for the location of time zones and the dividing lines between zones is set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations at 49 CFR 71.

Timeline of events

Hurricane WillaHurricane WalakaHurricane Olivia (2018)Hurricane Lane (2018)Hurricane Hector (2018)Tropical Storm Carlotta (2018)Hurricane Bud (2018)Saffir–Simpson scaleTimeline of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season

May

May 10

Pacific Time Zone North American time zone

The Pacific Time Zone (PT) is a time zone encompassing parts of western Canada, the western United States, and western Mexico. Places in this zone observe standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−08:00). During daylight saving time, a time offset of UTC−07:00 is used.

Low-pressure area region where the atmospheric pressure is lower than that of surrounding locations

A low-pressure area, low, depression or cyclone is a region on the topographic map where the atmospheric pressure is lower than that of surrounding locations. Low-pressure systems form under areas of wind divergence that occur in the upper levels of the troposphere. The formation process of a low-pressure area is known as cyclogenesis. Within the field of meteorology, atmospheric divergence aloft occurs in two areas. The first area is on the east side of upper troughs, which form half of a Rossby wave within the Westerlies. A second area of wind divergence aloft occurs ahead of embedded shortwave troughs, which are of smaller wavelength. Diverging winds aloft ahead of these troughs cause atmospheric lift within the troposphere below, which lowers surface pressures as upward motion partially counteracts the force of gravity.

Baja California Peninsula peninsula of North America on the Pacific Coast of Mexico

The Baja California Peninsula is a peninsula in Northwestern Mexico. It separates the Pacific Ocean from the Gulf of California. The peninsula extends 1,247 km from Mexicali, Baja California in the north to Cabo San Lucas, Baja California Sur in the south. It ranges from 40 km at its narrowest to 320 km at its widest point and has approximately 3,000 km of coastline and approximately 65 islands. The total area of the Baja California Peninsula is 143,390 km2 (55,360 sq mi).

May 11

May 13

May 15

June

June 1

Aletta as a Category 4 hurricane on June 8 Aletta 2018-06-08 1825Z.jpg
Aletta as a Category 4 hurricane on June 8

June 6

June 7

June 8

June 9

June 10

Hurricane Bud intensifying off the coast of Mexico on June 11 Bud 2018-06-11 1950Z.jpg
Hurricane Bud intensifying off the coast of Mexico on June 11

June 11

June 12

June 13

Tropical Storm Carlotta paralleling the coast of Mexico on June 16 Carlotta 2018-06-16 2001Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Carlotta paralleling the coast of Mexico on June 16

June 14

June 15

June 16

June 17

June 19

Tropical Storm Daniel on June 24 at peak intensity Daniel 2018-06-24 1830Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Daniel on June 24 at peak intensity

June 24

June 25

June 26

June 27

June 28

June 29

June 30

July

July 1

Hurricane Fabio near peak intensity on July 3 Fabio 2018-07-03 2120Z.jpg
Hurricane Fabio near peak intensity on July 3

July 2

July 3

July 4

July 5

July 6

July 9

July 26

July 27

July 28

July 29

July 31

August

August 1

August 2

August 3

August 4

Hector as a high-end Category 4 hurricane on August 6 Hector 2018-08-05 2245Z (alternate).jpg
Hector as a high-end Category 4 hurricane on August 6

August 5

September

October

November

November 2

November 3

November 4

November 6

November 9

November 30

Notes

α This value is an operational intensity for a storm within the National Hurricane Center's area of responsibility and is subject to change in the post storm analysis.
β This value is an operational intensity for a storm within the Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility and is subject to change in the post storm analysis.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Timeline of the 2016 Pacific hurricane season

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Timeline of the 2017 Pacific hurricane season

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References

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Preceded by
2017
Pacific hurricane season timelines
2018
Succeeded by
2019