Timeline of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season

Last updated
2018 Pacific hurricane season
2018 Pacific hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedMay 10, 2018
Last system dissipatedNovember 5, 2018
Strongest system
NameWalaka
Maximum winds160 mph (260 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure920 mbar (hPa; 27.17 inHg)
Longest lasting system
NameSergio
Duration13.50 days
Storm articles
Other years
2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

The 2018 Pacific hurricane season was an event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific Ocean. The season officially started on May 15 in the eastern Pacific—east of 140°W—and began on June 1 in the central Pacific—between the International Date Line and 140°W, and ended on November 30. These dates typically cover the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin. [1]

Contents

Four time zones are utilized in the basin: Central for storms east of 106°W, Mountain between 114.9°W and 106°W, Pacific between 140°W and 115°W, [2] and Hawaii–Aleutian for storms between the International Date Line and 140°W. However, for convenience, all information is listed by Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) first with the respective local time included in parentheses. This timeline includes information that was not operationally released, meaning that data from post-storm reviews by the National Hurricane Center is included. This timeline documents tropical cyclone formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, and dissipations during the season.

Timeline of events

Hurricane WillaHurricane WalakaHurricane Olivia (2018)Hurricane Lane (2018)Hurricane Hector (2018)Tropical Storm Carlotta (2018)Hurricane Bud (2018)Saffir–Simpson scaleTimeline of the 2018 Pacific hurricane season

May

May 10

May 11

May 13

May 15

June

June 1

Aletta as a Category 4 hurricane on June 8 Aletta 2018-06-08 1825Z.jpg
Aletta as a Category 4 hurricane on June 8

June 6

June 7

June 8

June 9

June 10

Hurricane Bud intensifying off the coast of Mexico on June 11 Bud 2018-06-11 1950Z.jpg
Hurricane Bud intensifying off the coast of Mexico on June 11

June 11

June 12

June 13

Tropical Storm Carlotta paralleling the coast of Mexico on June 16 Carlotta 2018-06-16 2001Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Carlotta paralleling the coast of Mexico on June 16

June 14

June 15

June 16

June 17

June 19

Tropical Storm Daniel on June 24 at peak intensity Daniel 2018-06-24 1830Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Daniel on June 24 at peak intensity

June 24

June 25

June 26

June 27

June 28

June 29

June 30

July

July 1

Hurricane Fabio near peak intensity on July 3 Fabio 2018-07-03 2120Z.jpg
Hurricane Fabio near peak intensity on July 3

July 2

July 3

July 4

July 5

July 6

July 9

July 26

July 27

July 28

July 29

July 31

August

August 1

August 2

August 3

August 4

Tropical Storm Ileana near peak intensity off the western coast of Mexico on August 5 Ileana 2018-08-05 1725Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Ileana near peak intensity off the western coast of Mexico on August 5

August 5

August 6

August 7

August 8

August 9

August 10

Hector as a high-end Category 4 hurricane on August 6 Hector 2018-08-05 2245Z (alternate).jpg
Hector as a high-end Category 4 hurricane on August 6

August 11

August 12

August 13

August 15

September

October

October 14

October 15

October 16

November

November 2

November 3

November 4

November 6

November 9

November 30

Notes

α This value is an operational intensity for a storm within the National Hurricane Center's area of responsibility and is subject to change in the post storm analysis.
β This value is an operational intensity for a storm within the Central Pacific Hurricane Center's area of responsibility and is subject to change in the post storm analysis.

See also

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Preceded by
2017
Pacific hurricane season timelines
2018
Succeeded by
2019