Timeline of the American Revolution

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Timeline of the American Revolutiontimeline of the political upheaval culminating in the 18th century in which Thirteen Colonies in North America joined together for independence from the British Empire, and after victory in the Revolutionary War combined to form the United States of America. The American Revolution includes political, social, and military aspects. The revolutionary era is generally considered to have begun with the passage of the Stamp Act in 1765 and ended with the ratification of the United States Bill of Rights in 1791. The military phase of the revolution, the American Revolutionary War, lasted from 1775 to 1783.

Contents

1600s

1629

1683

1684

1686

1689

1691

1750s

Join, or Die woodcut by Benjamin Franklin, 1754 Benjamin Franklin - Join or Die.jpg
Join, or Die woodcut by Benjamin Franklin, 1754

1754

1760s

1760

1763

Eastern North America in 1775, including the British Province of Quebec (pink), Indian Reserve (pink), and areas open to European-American settlement in the 13 Colonies along the Atlantic coast (red), plus the westward border established by the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and present-day state lines Map of territorial growth 1775.jpg
Eastern North America in 1775, including the British Province of Quebec (pink), Indian Reserve (pink), and areas open to European-American settlement in the 13 Colonies along the Atlantic coast (red), plus the westward border established by the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and present–day state lines

1764

1765

1766

1767

1768

1769

1770s

1770

The Boston Massacre, an engraving by patriot Paul Revere Boston Massacre.jpg
The Boston Massacre, an engraving by patriot Paul Revere

1771

1772

1773

1774

1775

Battles of Lexington and Concord. Percy's Rescue at Lexington Detail.jpg
Battles of Lexington and Concord.

1776

Declaration of Independence, 1819 painting by John Trumbull Declaration of Independence (1819), by John Trumbull.jpg
Declaration of Independence , 1819 painting by John Trumbull
Washington Crossing the Delaware, painting 1851 by Emanuel Leutze Washington Crossing the Delaware by Emanuel Leutze, MMA-NYC, 1851.jpg
Washington Crossing the Delaware , painting 1851 by Emanuel Leutze

1777

Surrender of General Burgoyne, 1821 painting by John Trumbull Surrender of General Burgoyne.jpg
Surrender of General Burgoyne , 1821 painting by John Trumbull

1778

1779

1780s

1780

Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, 1820 painting by John Trumbull Surrender of Lord Cornwallis.jpg
Surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, 1820 painting by John Trumbull

1781

1782

1783

Washington's Entry into New York by Currier & Ives (1857) Washington's entry into New York 1783, Currier and Ives 1857.jpg
Washington's Entry into New York by Currier & Ives (1857)

1784

1785

1786

1787

Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States, by Howard Chandler Christy (1940) Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States.jpg
Scene at the Signing of the Constitution of the United States , by Howard Chandler Christy (1940)

1788

1789

1790s

1791

1792

1793

1795

1796

1797

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">American Revolutionary War</span> 1775–1783 American war of independence

The American Revolutionary War, also known as the Revolutionary War or American War of Independence, was the military conflict of the American Revolution, when American Patriot forces, organized as the Continental Army and commanded by George Washington, defeated the British Army. The war ended with the Treaty of Paris in 1783, in which Great Britain recognized the independence and sovereignty of the United States. During the war, American Patriot forces eventually gained the support of France and Spain, while the British and Loyalist forces hired Hessian soldiers from Germany for assistance. The conflict was fought in North America, the Caribbean, and the Atlantic Ocean.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Continental Congress</span> Convention of delegates that became the governing body of the United States (1774–1789)

The Continental Congress was a series of legislative bodies, with some executive function, for the Thirteen Colonies of Great Britain in North America, and the newly declared United States before, during, and after the American Revolutionary War. The Continental Congress refers to both the First and Second Congresses of 1774–1781 and at the time, also described the Congress of the Confederation of 1781–1789. The Confederation Congress operated as the first federal government until being replaced following ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Until 1785, the Congress met predominantly at what is today Independence Hall in Philadelphia, though it was relocated temporarily on several occasions during the Revolutionary War and the fall of Philadelphia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Continental Army</span> Colonial army during the American Revolutionary War

The Continental Army was the army of the United Colonies representing the Thirteen Colonies and later the United States during the American Revolutionary War. It was formed on June 14, 1775 by a resolution passed by the Second Continental Congress, meeting in Philadelphia after the war's outbreak. The Continental Army was created to coordinate military efforts of the colonies in the war against the British, who sought to maintain control over the American colonies. General George Washington was appointed commander-in-chief of the Continental Army and maintained this position throughout the war.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Siege of Boston</span> 1775–76 American Revolutionary War campaign

The siege of Boston was the opening phase of the American Revolutionary War. In the siege, American patriot militia led by newly-installed Continental Army commander George Washington prevented the British Army, which was garrisoned in Boston, from moving by land. Both sides faced resource, supply, and personnel challenges during the siege. British resupply and reinforcement was limited to sea access, which was impeded by American vessels. The British ultimately abandoned Boston after eleven months, moving their troops and equipment north, to Nova Scotia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Second Continental Congress</span> 1775–1781 convention of the Thirteen Colonies

The Second Continental Congress was the late-18th-century meeting of delegates from the Thirteen Colonies that united in support of the American Revolution and its associated Revolutionary War, which established American independence from the British Empire. The Congress created a new country that it first named the United Colonies, and in 1776, renamed the United States of America. The Congress began convening in Philadelphia, on May 10, 1775, with representatives from 12 of the 13 colonies, after the Battles of Lexington and Concord.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Benjamin Lincoln</span> Continental Army general (1733–1810)

Benjamin Lincoln was an American army officer. He served as a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Lincoln was involved in three major surrenders during the war: his participation in the Battles of Saratoga contributed to John Burgoyne's surrender of a British army, he oversaw the largest American surrender of the war at the 1780 siege of Charleston, and, as George Washington's second in command, he formally accepted the British surrender at Yorktown.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Boston campaign</span> Opening campaign of the American Revolutionary War

The Boston campaign was the opening campaign of the American Revolutionary War, taking place primarily in the Province of Massachusetts Bay. The campaign began with the Battles of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775, in which the local colonial militias interdicted a British government attempt to seize military stores and leaders in Concord, Massachusetts. The entire British expedition suffered significant casualties during a running battle back to Charlestown against an ever-growing number of militia.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Massachusetts Line</span>

The Massachusetts Line was those units within the Continental Army that were assigned to Massachusetts at various times by the Continental Congress during the American Revolutionary War. These, together with similar contingents from the other twelve states, formed the Continental Line. Line regiments were assigned to a particular state, which was then financially responsible for the maintenance of the regiment. The concept of the line was also particularly important in relation to the promotion of commissioned officers. Officers of the Continental Army below the rank of brigadier general were ordinarily ineligible for promotion except in the line of their own state.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New Hampshire Line</span> Formation in the Continental Army

The New Hampshire Line was a formation in the Continental Army. The term "New Hampshire Line" referred to the quota of numbered infantry regiments assigned to New Hampshire at various times by the Continental Congress. These, along with similar contingents from the other twelve states, formed the Continental Line. For the promotion of senior officials, this concept is particularly important. Officers of the Continental Army below the rank of brigadier general were ordinarily ineligible for promotion except in the line of their own state.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Pennsylvania in the American Revolution</span>

Pennsylvania was the site of many key events associated with the American Revolution and American Revolutionary War. The city of Philadelphia, then capital of the Thirteen Colonies and the largest city in the colonies, was a gathering place for the Founding Fathers who discussed, debated, developed, and ultimately implemented many of the acts, including signing the Declaration of Independence, that inspired and launched the revolution and the quest for independence from the British Empire.

Events from the year 1776 in Great Britain.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Sullivan (general)</span> American judge and general (1740–1795)

John Sullivan was an American general in the Revolutionary War winning several key battles most notably the Delaware crossing. He was a delegate in the Continental Congress where he signed the Continental Association, the third governor of New Hampshire, and a United States district judge of the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire.

1776 is celebrated in the United States as the official beginning of the nation, with the Declaration of Independence of the Thirteen Colonies from the British Empire issued on July 4.

Events from the year 1777 in the United States.

Events from the year 1778 in the United States.

Events from the year 1781 in the United States. This year marked the beginning of government under the Articles of Confederation as well as the surrender of British armed forces in the American Revolution.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Virginia in the American Revolution</span>

The history of Virginia in the American Revolution begins with the role the Colony of Virginia played in early dissent against the British government and culminates with the defeat of General Cornwallis by the allied forces at the Siege of Yorktown in 1781, an event that signaled the effective military end to the conflict. Numerous Virginians played key roles in the Revolution, including George Washington, Patrick Henry, and Thomas Jefferson.

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the American Revolutionary War.

References

  1. "Founders Online: The Final Hearing before the Privy Council Committee for Plant …".
  2. Declaration and Resolves of the First Continental Congress, New Haven, Connecticut: Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School: Avalon Project, October 14, 1774, retrieved January 10, 2022
  3. Continental Congress (October 20, 1774). "Continental Association (Articles of Association)". Founders Online (founders.archives.gov). National Archives. Retrieved January 10, 2022.

Further reading