Timeline of the Croat–Bosniak War

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The Croat–Bosniak War was a conflict between the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the Croatian Community of Herzeg-Bosnia, supported by Croatia, that lasted from 19 June 1992 23 February 1994. The Croat-Bosniak War is often referred to as a "war within a war" because it was part of the larger Bosnian War.

Contents

1991

March

November

1992

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

1993

January

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

1994

January

February

Notes

  1. "ICTY: Naletilić and Martinović verdict – A. Historical background" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2011-08-06. Retrieved 2009-09-23.
  2. Ramet 2010, p. 264.
  3. 1 2 "ICTY Blaškić verdict – III. FACTS AND DISCUSSION – A. The Lasva Valley: May 1992 – January 1993 – Page 123" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2009-09-23.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "ICTY: Prlić et al. (IT-04-74)". Archived from the original on 2010-06-06. Retrieved 2009-09-25.
  5. Shrader 2003, p. 25.
  6. "ICTY: Blaškić verdict – A. The Lasva Valley: May 1992 – January 1993" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2009-09-23.
  7. Ramet 2010, p. 127.
  8. 1 2 "ICTY: Blaškić verdict – A. The Lasva Valley: May 1992 – January 1993 c) The municipality of Kiseljak" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2009-09-23.
  9. Prlic et al. judgement vol.1 2013, p. 155.
  10. Lukic, Reneo; Lynch, Allen (1996). Europe From the Balkans to the Urals: The Disintegration of Yugoslavia and the Soviet Union. Oxford University Press. p. 215.
  11. 1 2 "ICTY: Blaškić verdict – A. The Lasva Valley: May 1992 – January 1993 – b) The municipality of Busovača" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2009-09-23.
  12. "ICTY: Blaškić verdict – A. The Lasva Valley: May 1992 – January 1993 – a) The municipality of Vitez" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2011-06-06. Retrieved 2009-09-23.
  13. Kordic & Cerkez Judgement 2001, p. 153-154.
  14. ICTY – Kordic and Cerkez judgment – II. PERSECUTION: THE HVO TAKE-OVERS C. The HVO Take-Over in Other Municipalities – Archived 2012-06-29 at the Wayback Machine
  15. Malcolm 1995, p. 318.
  16. ICTY – Blaskic Judgement – A. The Lasva Valley: May 1992 – January 1993 – c) The municipality of Kiseljak Archived 2011-06-06 at the Wayback Machine
  17. 1 2 Shrader 2003, p. 46.
  18. 1 2 3 ICTY: Kordic and Cerkez Judgement – III. EVENTS LEADING TO THE CONFLICT – A. July – September 1992 – 1. The Role of Dario Kordic – Archived 2012-06-29 at the Wayback Machine
  19. ICTY – Kordic and Cerkez Judgement – 2. Ruling of the BiH Constitutional Court Archived 2012-06-29 at the Wayback Machine
  20. "ICTY: Kordic and Cerkez Judgement – III. EVENTS LEADING TO THE CONFLICT – A. July – September 1992 – 1. The Role of Dario Kordic" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 June 2012. Retrieved 8 January 2010. On 30 September 1992 Kordic, as Vice-President of HZ H-B, was present at a meeting of the Presidency of the Kakanj HVO, a neighbouring municipality to Vares. The minutes of the meeting record Kordic as saying that the HVO was the government of the HZ H-B and what they were doing with the HZ H-B was the realisation of a complete political platform: they would not take Kakanj by force but "it is a question of time whether we will take or give up what is ours. It has been written down that Vares and Kakanj are in HZ H-B. The Muslims are losing morale and then it will end with 'give us what you will'".
  21. "ICTY – Kordic and Cerkez Judgement – 1. Conflict in Novi Travnik" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2012-06-29. Retrieved 2010-01-08.
  22. 1 2 3 "ICTY – Kordic and Cerkez Judgement – 2. Ahmici Barricade" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2012-06-29. Retrieved 2010-01-08.
  23. 1 2 3 "ICTY – Kordic and Cerkez Judgement – 3. After the Conflict" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 2012-06-29. Retrieved 2010-01-08.
  24. "SENSE Tribunal: ICTY – EVICT, BURN AND EXPEL". The Prozor main street was "a mess", there were signs of shelling everywhere, almost every fifth house had been burned down, and the soldiers were busy looting the shops. In those events in Prozor, Vuillamy recognized the "pattern of ethnic cleansing" he had seen as a war correspondent in the operations the Serb forces had launched in eastern Croatia and north-western Bosnia. He summed up the pattern as follows for the judges: "Evict them, burn them and expel them!"
  25. SENSE Tribunal: ICTY – "THE MOST POWERFUL MEN IN THE HERCEG BOSNA PROJECT" ON TRIAL – "SENSE Tribunal : ICTY". Archived from the original on 2007-11-10. Retrieved 2012-01-28.
  26. Malcolm 1995, p. 326.
  27. Prlic et al. judgement summary 2013, p. 155.
  28. CIA 2002, p. 190-191.
  29. 1 2 Hadzihasanovic & Kubura Judgement Summary 2006, p. 5.
  30. CIA 2002, p. 191.
  31. Shrader 2003, p. 87.
  32. CIA 2002b, p. 433-434.
  33. Shrader 2003, p. 88-89.
  34. CIA 2002, p. 192.
  35. "Three Bosniak Soldiers Convicted of Trusina Massacre". justice-report.com. 2015. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-03-27.
  36. Myers & 06 May 1993.
  37. Christia 2012, p. 157.
  38. CIA 2002, p. 195.
  39. Delic Judgement Summary 2008, p. 3.
  40. Schindler 2007, p. 99.
  41. Shrader 2003, p. 132-133.
  42. CIA 2002, p. 196.
  43. CIA 2002, p. 197.
  44. CIA 2002b, p. 425.
  45. CIA 2002b, p. 429.
  46. CIA 2002, p. 199.
  47. Magaš & Žanić 2001, p. 369.
  48. "Judgement in the Case the Prosecutor v. Sefer Halilovic". Archived from the original on 2015-06-23. Retrieved 2015-07-08.
  49. Ramet 2010, p. 265.
  50. "Bosnian Croats Commemorate Anniversary of Unprosecuted Killings" . Retrieved 1 July 2023.

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