Times Building (Huntsville, Alabama)

Last updated
Times Building
Times Building Dec2009 01.jpg
Times Building (Huntsville, Alabama)
Alternative namesHuntsville Daily Times Building
Huntsville Times Building
General information
TypeCommercial office building; educational institution
Architectural styleArt Deco
Address228 East Holmes Avenue
Town or city Huntsville, Alabama
CountryUnited States
Coordinates 34°43′59″N86°35′07″W / 34.7330°N 86.5852°W / 34.7330; -86.5852 Coordinates: 34°43′59″N86°35′07″W / 34.7330°N 86.5852°W / 34.7330; -86.5852
OpenedDecember 1928 [1]
Height125 feet [2]
Technical details
Floor count12 [2]
Floor area34,000 sq ft (3,200 m2) [3]
Lifts/elevators2
Design and construction
Architecture firmR.H. Hunt Co. [4]
Other information
ParkingStreet
Times Building
Built1926–28
ArchitectR.H. Hunt Company
MPS Downtown Huntsville MRA
NRHP reference No. 80000726 [5]
Added to NRHPSeptember 22, 1980

The Times Building is one of the oldest and tallest buildings in Huntsville, Alabama, United States. Standing at 125 feet (38 m), the twelve story skyscraper opened in December 1928 as the headquarters for The Huntsville Times . The building, which is primarily used for office space, is located at the intersection of Holmes Avenue and Greene Street on the north side of Downtown Huntsville. In 1980, the building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [5]

Contents

Tenants

J.F. Drake State Community and Technical College moved into the basement level of the building in January 2010 with seven classrooms (including two large computer labs) covering 10,000 square feet (930 m2). [6]

History

Originally the building was only to have eleven floors, but a twelfth floor was added during construction when the builder of the Russel Erskine Hotel announced that it would have twelve floors. [7] As a result of the extra floor being added during construction, the elevators do not reach the top floor.

The Huntsville Times occupied the building from the building's opening in 1928 until 1956 when it relocated to a new facility on Memorial Parkway.

From the 1970s until forced to relocate in the late 1980s, the building was home to two public radio stations, WLRH (in the basement) and the commercial radio station WAHR (which billed itself as broadcasting from "The Top of the Times").

Related Research Articles

Woolworth Building Skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper designed by architect Cass Gilbert located at 233 Broadway in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. It was the tallest building in the world from 1913 to 1930, with a height of 792 feet (241 m). More than a century after its construction, it remains one of the 100 tallest buildings in the United States.

Metropolitan Life North Building Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

The Metropolitan Life North Building, now known as Eleven Madison, is a 30-story art deco skyscraper in the Flatiron District adjacent to Madison Square Park in Manhattan, New York City, at 11-25 Madison Avenue. The building is bordered by East 24th Street, Madison Avenue, East 25th Street and Park Avenue South, and was formerly connected by a sky bridge and tunnel to the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company Tower just south of it.

Penobscot Building Skyscraper in Detroit

The Greater Penobscot Building, commonly known as the Penobscot Building, is a class-A office tower in Downtown Detroit, Michigan. The 1928 Art Deco building is located in the heart of the Detroit Financial District. The Penobscot is a hub for the city's wireless Internet zone and fiber-optic network.

1 Wall Street Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

1 Wall Street is a skyscraper in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City, on the eastern side of Broadway between Wall Street and Exchange Place. 1 Wall Street, designed in the Art Deco style, is 654 feet (199 m) tall and consists of two sections. The original 50-story building was designed by Ralph Thomas Walker of the firm Voorhees, Gmelin and Walker and constructed between 1929 and 1931, while a 36-story annex to the south was designed by successor firm Voorhees, Walker Smith Smith & Haines and built from 1963 to 1965.

14 Wall Street, originally the Bankers Trust Company Building, is a skyscraper at the intersection of Wall Street and Nassau Street in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. The building is 540 feet (160 m) tall, with 32 usable floors. It is composed of the original 540-foot tower at the southeastern corner of the site, as well as a shorter annex wrapping around the original tower.

Chanin Building Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

The Chanin Building, also known as 122 East 42nd Street, is a 56-story office skyscraper in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. It is located on the southwest corner of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue, near Grand Central Terminal to the north and adjacent to 110 East 42nd Street to the west. The building is named for Irwin S. Chanin, its developer.

20 Exchange Place Residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

20 Exchange Place, formerly the City Bank–Farmers Trust Building, is a skyscraper in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City. Completed in 1931, it was designed by Cross & Cross in the Art Deco style as the headquarters of the City Bank–Farmers Trust Company, predecessor of Citigroup. The building, standing at approximately 741 feet (226 m) with 57 usable stories, was one of the city's tallest buildings and the world's tallest stone-clad building at the time of its completion. While 20 Exchange Place was intended to be the world's tallest building at the time of its construction, the Great Depression resulted in the current scaled-back plan.

1001 Woodward Skyscraper in Detroit

1001 Woodward is an office building in Downtown Detroit, Michigan. It replaced the Majestic Building, a 14-story high rise on the same site. The building is located just south of the neighboring David Stott Building, at the corner of Woodward Avenue and Michigan Avenue overlooking Campus Martius Park. Constructed from 1963 to 1965, the 25-story building is designed in the International Style. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

First National Center (Oklahoma City) Prominent mixed-use skyscraper in downtown Oklahoma City

First National Center, formerly known as First National Bank Building, is a prominent mixed-use skyscraper in downtown Oklahoma City. The art deco tower is 406 feet tall at the roof, and is 446 feet at its spire and contains 33 floors. The building was constructed in 1931 by the First National Bank and Trust Company of Oklahoma City and has 990,000 square feet (92,000 m2) of office space.

21 West Street Residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

21 West Street, also known as Le Rivage Apartments, is a 33-story building located in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City, on Morris Street between West Street and Washington Street. It was built in 1929–1931 as a speculative office tower development in anticipation of an increased demand for office space in Lower Manhattan. The building was converted into apartments in 1997 and was renamed Le Rivage.

New York Life Building Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

The New York Life Building is the headquarters of the New York Life Insurance Company at 51 Madison Avenue in New York City. The building, designed by Cass Gilbert, abuts Madison Square Park in the Rose Hill and NoMad neighborhoods of Manhattan. It occupies an entire city block bounded by Madison Avenue, Park Avenue South, and 26th and 27th Streets.

Empire Building (Manhattan) Residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

The Empire Building is an office skyscraper at 71 Broadway, on the corner of Rector Street, in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. It was designed by Kimball & Thompson in the Classical Revival style and built by Marc Eidlitz & Son from 1897 to 1898. The building consists of 21 stories above a full basement story facing Trinity Place at the back of the building and is 293 feet (89 m) tall.

65 Broadway Office skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

65 Broadway, formerly the American Express Building, is a building on Broadway between Morris and Rector Streets in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City. The 21-story concrete and steel-frame structure, an office building, was designed by James L. Aspinwall of the firm Renwick, Aspinwall & Tucker in the Neoclassical style. 65 Broadway extends westward through an entire block, to Trinity Place. Its most prominent feature is its H-shaped building plan, with light courts located between its wings.

United States Customhouse and Post Office (St. Louis, Missouri) United States historic place

The U.S. Custom House and Post Office is a court house at 815 Olive Street in downtown St. Louis, Missouri.

John Hand Building United States historic place

John Hand Building is a mixed-use high rise building in Birmingham, Alabama, USA, with a height of 287 feet (87 m). It was the tallest building in the city until surpassed by the City Federal Building in 1913. It comprises 20 floors and was completed in 1912. The lower eight floors are for commercial use and the upper twelve floors are for residential use. In 1983, the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Kahl Building United States historic place

The Kahl Building is an historic building located in Downtown Davenport, Iowa, United States. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. In 2020 it was included as a contributing property in the Davenport Downtown Commercial Historic District. The building also includes the Capitol Theatre.

First National Bank (Huntsville, Alabama) United States historic place

The First National Bank is a historic bank building in Huntsville, Alabama. The temple-form Greek Revival structure was built in 1835–1836. Designed by locally famous architect George Steele, it occupies a prominent position, facing the courthouse square and sitting on a bluff directly above the Big Spring. It was the longest-serving bank building in Alabama, operating until 2010 when Regions Bank moved their downtown branch to a new location. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

Woodlark Building Historic building in Portland, Oregon, U.S.

The Woodlark Building is a historic commercial building in downtown Portland, Oregon, United States that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The nine-story building was designed by Doyle, Patterson & Beach, and constructed in 1911–12. It has been described as "one of Portland's earliest commercial skyscrapers". From its completion until 1924, it was the headquarters of two jointly owned and very similarly named pharmaceutical companies based in Portland, the retail Woodard, Clarke & Company, and the wholesale Clarke-Woodward Company. It was converted into an office building in 1924. The retail space on the ground floor, mezzanine and basement has held a variety of businesses, in succession over the building's history, among the longest-lasting ones being a drugstore (1912–1927), a Sherman Clay piano and music store (1930–1974), and an independent shoe store (2000–2016).

Federal Reserve Bank Building (Seattle) Historic bank building in Seattle, Washington

The Federal Reserve Bank Building, also known as the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, Seattle Branch, served as the offices of the Seattle branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco for over 50 years, from 1951 to 2008.

150 Nassau Street Residential skyscraper in Manhattan, New York

150 Nassau Street, also known as the Park Place Tower and the American Tract Society Building, is a 23-story, 291-foot (89 m) building in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City. It is located at the southeast corner of Spruce Street and Nassau Street, next to 8 Spruce Street, the former New York Times Building, and New York City Hall.

References

  1. Marshall, Mike (10 January 2010). "The Huntsville Times to celebrate its 100th birthday this year". The Huntsville Times. Retrieved 21 February 2012.
  2. 1 2 "Huntsville Times Building, Huntsville". Skyscraper Page. Retrieved 21 February 2012.
  3. "Office For Lease in Huntsville AL The Times Building". Commercial Property Directory. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013. Retrieved 22 February 2012.
  4. "ALABAMA (AL), Madison County". National Register of Historical Places. Retrieved 22 February 2012.
  5. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010. Retrieved April 6, 2017.
  6. Roop, Lee (24 November 2009). "Drake Tech ready to begin new phase as downtown school". The Huntsville Times. Retrieved 21 February 2012.
  7. "Times Building - Buildings". Emporis. Retrieved 22 February 2012.