Timothy Barnes, 4th Baron Gorell

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Timothy John Radcliffe Barnes, 4th Baron Gorell (2 August 1927 – 25 September 2007) was a British businessman. [1]

He succeeded in the barony upon the death of his father, Ronald Barnes, 3rd Baron Gorell in 1963.

He married Joan Marion Collins in 1954 and had two adopted daughters. Since there was no male issue from this marriage, Lord Gorell was succeeded by his nephew, John Picton Gorell Barnes, only son of his younger brother, Hon. Ronald Alexander Henry Barnes (1931–2003). [2]

Coat of arms of Timothy Barnes, 4th Baron Gorell
Coronet of a British Baron.svg
Gorell Escutcheon.png
Crest
In front of a cubit arm in armour, the hand grasping a broken sword all Proper the wrist encircled by a wreath of oak Or, five annulets interlaced and fessways Argent.
Escutcheon
Azure two lions passant guardant Ermine each holding in the dexter paw a sprig of oak slipped Or between three annulets in pale Argent.
Supporters
On either side a ram Proper charged on the shoulder with two annulets interlaced Azure.
Motto
Frangas Non Flectes (You May Break, You Shall Not Bend Me) [3]

See also

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Gorell may refer to:

Timothy or Tim Barnes may refer to:

References

  1. "Timothy John Radcliffe Barnes, 4th Baron Gorell Synonyms, Timothy John Radcliffe Barnes, 4th Baron Gorell Antonyms | Thesaurus.com". Archived from the original on 24 July 2011.
  2. Cracroft peerage Archived 2012-07-29 at archive.today
  3. Debrett's Peerage & Baronetage. 2000.
Peerage of the United Kingdom
Preceded by Baron Gorell
19632007
Succeeded by