Timothy Dwight (Massachusetts politician)

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Timothy Dwight's tombstone Timothy Dwight tombstone.jpg
Timothy Dwight's tombstone

Captain Timothy Dwight (1629–1718) represented Dedham in the Great and General Court [1] of Massachusetts and was the progenitor of the Dwight family. [2]

Contents

Personal life

Dwight was born in England in 1629 to John and Hannah Dwight [1] and was brought to Dedham, Massachusetts in 1635 as a child. [3] [1] John Dwight was one of the first settlers of Dedham. [4] Timothy was made a freeman in 1655 and was a member of the First Church and Parish in Dedham beginning in 1652. [1]

Dwight was married six times. The first time was on November 11, 1651, to Sarah Perman, who died while giving childbirth on May 29, 1652. [5] [6] On May 3, 1653, he married Sarah Powell, who died on June 27, 1664; she gave him four children. [5] [6] [lower-alpha 1] Anna Flynt, his third wife on January 9, 1664 – 1665, gave him 10 children, including Josiah Dwight. [7] [5] [lower-alpha 2]

His fourth wife, the widow Mary Endwind of Reading, Massachusetts, married him on January 7, 1686 – 1687 and died August 30, 1688, without any children. [8] Esther Fisher became his fifth wife on July 31, 1690, and died on January 30, 1690 – 1691. [lower-alpha 3] Bethia Morse, his final wife, married him on February 1, 1691 – 1692 and died on February 6, 1717 – 1718. [6] He had 14 children. [3]

Military and public service

Dwight served in the Great and General Court from 1691 to 1692 and perhaps later. [1] He also served for 10 years as Town Clerk and 25 years as selectman. [1] His public service was praised by Rev. Samuel Dexter, who called him "a man of renown." [1]

Dwight, with Richard Ellis, served as the agent of the Town when negotiating with King Phillip for title to the land today known as Wrentham, Massachusetts in 1660. [9] He was also town clerk for a total of 10 years, having first been elected in 1661. [10] [11] He served 24 terms as selectman, beginning in 1644. [12]

He was a cornet of a cavalry troop as a young man and later served as a captain of foot soldiers. [1] He fought against the native peoples in the area ten times, and either killed or took prisoner nine. [1]

Death

Dwight built the first tomb in the Old Village Cemetery around 1700. [13] [9] In that tomb are laid his body, Eleazer Lusher, William Adams. [2] He died on January 31, 1718, and was buried on February 7, 1718, the same day as his wife, [2] [1] [8] Bethia, who died the day before. [6] His pallbearers included Governor Joseph Dudley and Judge Samuel Sewall. [2]

Notes

  1. Sarah was the daughter of Michael Powell [4] [5]
  2. Flynt was born September 11, 1642. Her maternal uncle was Leonard Hoar, President of Harvard College. [5]
  3. Esther was the daughter of Daniel Fisher [4]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Dwight 1874, p. 102.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Smith 1936, p. 147.
  3. 1 2 Goodwin 1982, p. 41.
  4. 1 2 3 Goodwin 1982, p. 40.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 Dwight 1874, p. 104.
  6. 1 2 3 4 Goodwin 1982, pp. 40–41.
  7. Sewall, Samuel (1882). Diary of Samuel Sewall: 1674-1729. Massachusetts Historical Society. p. 194. Retrieved June 12, 2021.
  8. 1 2 Dwight 1874, p. 105.
  9. 1 2 Dwight 1874, p. 103.
  10. Worthington 1827, p. 79.
  11. Hanson 1976, p. 70.
  12. Worthington 1827, p. 79-81.
  13. Smith 1936, p. 146.

Works cited