Timothy Edward Howard

Last updated
Julia A. Redmond
(m. 1864,died)
Timothy Edward Howard
Timothy Edward Howard.jpg
Indiana Supreme Court Justice
In office
January 2, 1893 January 2, 1899
Children10
Alma mater University of Michigan/University of Notre Dame (AB)
Notre Dame Law School (LLB)
Occupation
  • Politician
  • lawyer
  • judge
  • educator
  • writer

Timothy Edward Howard (January 27, 1837 – July 9, 1916) was the 43rd Justice of the Indiana Supreme Court, professor at the University of Notre Dame, writer, and Civil War veteran. He served in the Indiana Senate from 1886 to 1892.

Contents

Early life and education

Timothy Edward Howard was born near Ann Arbor, Michigan, on January 27, 1837, to Martin Howard and Bridget (née Beahan) Howard. His father was a farmer. [1] [2] [3] He attended county schools and Ypsilanti Union School. He attended the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, but left in his sophomore year. [2] [3] He briefly attended the University of Michigan, received a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Notre Dame in 1862, [4] and a Bachelor of Laws degree from the Notre Dame Law School in 1873. [5] Howard also received a diploma from the literary department at the University of Michigan. [6]

Career

Education career

Howard taught in country schools and was elected inspector of schools in Northfield Township, Michigan. [3]

Timothy Howard served on the faculty at Notre Dame from 1862 to 1914 with a few interruptions for public service. During his tenure he taught a wide range of subjects, including Astronomy, Civil Engineering, English Language and Literature, History, Latin, Law, Mathematics, and Rhetoric. [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] He held the chair of rhetoric and English literature at Notre Dame for nearly twenty years. [6] He served as dean of the Law School in 1908–09. [14]

In 1898 he became the first Notre Dame alumnus to receive the Laetare Medal, awarded by Notre Dame to a Catholic "whose genius has ennobled the arts and sciences, illustrated the ideals of the church and enriched the heritage of humanity." [15]

Military career

On February 5, 1862, Howard enlisted in Company I of the 12th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment. [2] [3] [6] [16] He was seriously wounded at the Battle of Shiloh during the American Civil War. [2] He recovered in a hospital in Evansville, Indiana, and was discharged from service on June 14, 1862, due to his injuries. [3]

Political and law career

In 1878 Howard was elected to the South Bend City Council, representing the fourth ward, as a Democrat. He remained with the City Council until 1883. [17] [18] From 1879 to 1883 Howard served as clerk of the Circuit Court in St. Joseph County, and in 1883 he was admitted to the bar. [2] [17] [6] He led the effort to create a public park on the St. Joseph river bank, which today bears his name. [16]

Howard was elected to the Indiana Senate as a Democrat in 1886 and served two terms. He was re-elected in 1890, but resigned in the spring of 1892. [3] [17]

In 1892, Howard was elected as a judge to the Supreme Court and served six years. [2] [3] After he retired from the bench, Howard continued to practice law until his death. [17] He served as city attorney from 1888 to 1893 and county attorney in South Bend. [2] [3] [6]

In 1901, Howard was appointed by Governor James A. Mount as president of the Fee and Salary Commission. Governor Winfield T. Durbin appointed Howard as delegate to the tax conference at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo in 1901. Governor Durbin appointed him as a member of the commission of 1903–1905 to codify the laws of the state. [3]

Howard also was president of the Northern Indiana Historical Society, and in 1907, he wrote a history of St. Joseph County. He also wrote other books on Indiana history. [3] [19]

Personal life

Howard married Julia A. Redmond of Detroit on July 14, 1864. They had ten children. His wife predeceased him. [2] [3] He lived at 714 East Cedar Street in South Bend. [2] [6] He was a member of the Catholic Church. [6]

Howard died on July 9, 1916, at St. Joseph's Hospital in South Bend following an operation a few days prior. He was buried at Cedar Grove Cemetery at the University of Notre Dame. [1]

Legacy

Howard Park in South Bend was named after him for his contributions to starting South Bend's public park system. [2]

Howard Hall at the University of Notre Dame was dedicated in 1925 in his honor. [20]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Judge T. E. Howard Hears Final Summons". South Bend Tribune . p. 1. Retrieved 2022-11-23 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Anderson & Cooley (1901). South Bend and the Men Who Have Made It. pp. 123–124. Retrieved 2022-11-23 via Archive.org.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 "Busy Life of Jurist is Ended at South Bend". Indianapolis News. 1916-07-10. p. 7. Retrieved 2022-11-23 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  4. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1861-62" (PDF).
  5. University of Notre Dame Annual Catalogue, 1872-73
  6. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 "New Supreme Court". South Bend Tribune . 1893-01-04. p. 4. Retrieved 2022-11-23 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  7. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1863-64" (PDF).
  8. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1865-66" (PDF).
  9. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1866-67" (PDF).
  10. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1873-74" (PDF).
  11. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1875-76" (PDF).
  12. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1883-84" (PDF).
  13. "University of Notre Dame, Annual Catalogue 1913-14" (PDF).
  14. "Local Items" (PDF). Notre Dame Scholastic. May 15, 1909. p. 544.
  15. Dame, ZR // Marketing Communications: Web // University of Notre. "Timothy Edward Howard // The Laetare Medal // University of Notre Dame". The Laetare Medal. Retrieved 2018-05-16.
  16. 1 2 Museum, Randy Ray The History. "A Look Back: Timothy Howard was a citizen, author and historian of St. Joseph County". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved 13 August 2019.
  17. 1 2 3 4 "Judge T. E. Howard Hears Final Summons". South Bend Tribune . 1916-07-10. p. 14. Retrieved 2022-11-23 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg
  18. "The Municipal Election". South Bend (Indiana) Daily Tribune. May 8, 1878. p. 4.
  19. "Howard behind city's first public park". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved 2018-05-16.
  20. "Heavy Enrollment Made At Notre Dame Opening". The South Bend Tribune . p. 11. Retrieved 2023-09-04 via Newspapers.com. Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg