Timothy F. O'Keefe

Last updated
Timothy F. O'Keefe
Timothy F. O'Keefe.jpg
Birth nameTimothy Francis O'Keefe
Born(1919-01-18)January 18, 1919
Brooklyn, New York City, U.S.
DiedOctober 14, 1984(1984-10-14) (aged 65)
Andrews AFB, Maryland, U.S.
Buried
AllegianceUnited States
Service/branch United States Air Force
Years of service1940–1974
Rank US-O10 insignia.svg General
Commands held
Battles/wars
Awards

Timothy Francis O'Keefe (January 18, 1919 – October 14, 1984) was a general in the United States Air Force and the commander of various units over the years.

Contents

Biography

Early life

O'Keefe was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1919. He graduated from St. Francis Preparatory School in Brooklyn in 1936 and attended St. Francis College thereafter. In March 1940, he entered military service as an aviation cadet and in November 1940 completed flight training at Kelly Field in Texas, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Army Air Corps Reserve. [1]

His next assignment was as a flight instructor at Kelly Field, Texas. On January 22, he married Eileen McSweeney. In June 1941 he was assigned as assistant aviation cadet supervisor of the Primary Flying School at Cuero, Texas, and in 1943 he became the commander. In January 1944 he attended the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and upon graduation in March 1944 returned to the Primary Flying School as commander. [1]

In September 1944, O'Keefe became operations and training staff officer for the Thirteenth Air Force in the Southwest Pacific. In January 1946, he was assigned to Headquarters Army Air Forces, Washington D.C., to serve as a member of the Operations Staff. He reported to Randolph Field, Texas, in July 1946 for duty as assistant director and then commander of the Primary Pilot Training School. [1]

In September 1947, he entered the Air Command and Staff School, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, and upon his graduation in June 1948, was assigned as air inspector at the Air Training Command, Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana. In July 1949, he returned to Texas, this time to Goodfellow Air Force Base, San Angelo, as commander of the 3545th Pilot Training Group. [1]

Korean War

O'Keefe next went to Japan as deputy for operations, Far East Air Materiel Command. During the Korean War in April 1951, he went to Korea as commander of the famed "Mosquito Group," the 6147th Tactical Control Group, which under his command underwent equipment improvement and tactical advances important in the development of tactical air control used during the Vietnam War. [1]

He returned to the United States in January 1952 and was commander of Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina, until December when he entered the Advanced Instrument Flying School at Moody Air Force Base, Georgia. Upon his graduation in March 1953, he was reassigned to Pope as inspector general for the Ninth Air Force. [1]

From August 1953 until August 1959, General O'Keefe served with fighter units at Alexandria Air Force Base, Louisiana, where he became deputy commander of the 366th Fighter-Bomber Wing, and at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, as deputy commander, 83rd Fighter-Day Wing and then commander of the 4th Tactical Fighter Wing. Between 1954 and 1958, he led the Tactical Air Command gunnery teams in the Worldwide Gunnery Meets at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. [1]

In August 1959, he entered the National War College in Washington D.C., and after graduation in July 1960 was assigned to the Seventeenth Air Force in Germany as deputy chief of staff, operations. He returned to Washington in July 1963 and was assigned to Headquarters United States Air Force as deputy director of operational requirements, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, Programs and Requirements, and in August 1964 became Assistant for Logistics Planning, Deputy Chief of Staff, Systems and Logistics. [1]

Vietnam War

General O'Keefe entered on his second tour of duty in Japan in August 1967 as vice commander of the Fifth Air Force and earned his third Legion of Merit while in this assignment. He had previously served with the Fifth Air Force during the Korean War. In August 1968 he returned to the United States as commander of Tactical Air Command's Ninth Air Force at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina. [1]

In October 1969 he was appointed director for logistics, the Joint Staff, Organization of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in Washington D.C. On February 11, 1971, his son Richard was killed in a plane crash while returning home from a mission in Vietnam. O'Keefe became vice commander in chief, Pacific Air Forces, in August of that year. Tim was appointed deputy commander in chief, U.S. Readiness Command with headquarters at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, in April 1973. [1]

He assumed command of the U.S. Support Activities Group/Seventh Air Force, with headquarters at Nakhon Phanom Royal Thai Air Force Base, Thailand, on October 8, 1973. [1]

Retirement and death

O'Keefe retired on September 1, 1974, and [1] died on October 14, 1984, at Malcolm Grow Medical Clinic. [2] He was survived by his wife Eileen, who died in 2005, and three sons.O'Keefe was buried at Arlington National Cemetery, in Arlington, Virginia. [3]

Awards

His military decorations and awards include the: [1]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles A. Gabriel</span> United States Air Force General

Charles Alvin Gabriel was the 11th Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force. As chief of staff, Gabriel served in a dual capacity. He was a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff which, as a body, acts as the principal military adviser to the president, the National Security Council, and the Secretary of Defense. In his other capacity, he was responsible to the Secretary of the Air Force for managing the vast human and materiel resources of the world's most powerful aerospace force.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Winfield W. Scott Jr.</span> United States Air Force general

Lieutenant General Winfield Wayne Scott Jr. was the tenth Superintendent of the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado. Thereafter, he was appointed Superintendent of the New Mexico Military Institute, a public military high school and junior college that is supported by the State of New Mexico, located in Roswell, New Mexico.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">George Lee Butler</span> US Air Force general

George Lee Butler, sometimes known as Lee Butler, is an American retired military officer. He was commander in chief, United States Strategic Command, and the last commander of Strategic Air Command. Following his retirement from the military he became active in the nuclear disarmament movement, calling for the outright abolition of nuclear weapons.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Carlos Talbott</span> United States Air Force general

Carlos Maurice Talbott was a United States Air Force officer who attained the rank of lieutenant general and was vice commander in chief of the Pacific Air Forces, headquartered at Hickam Air Force Base.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James P. Mullins</span> United States Air Force general

James P. Mullins is a retired United States Air Force four-star general who served as Commander, Air Force Logistics Command (COMAFLC) from 1981 to 1984.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bryce Poe II</span> United States Air Force general

Bryce Poe II was a United States Air Force four-star general who served as Commander, Air Force Logistics Command (COMAFLC) from 1978 to 1981.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">William D. Curry</span> United States Air Force general

Brigadier General William D. Curry Jr was a retired United States Air Force officer. He was a command pilot with over 6,500 flying hours, serving in World War II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Robert L. Rutherford</span> United States Air Force general

Robert Lynn Rutherford was a general in the United States Air Force who served as commander of the United States Transportation Command and of Pacific Air Forces. He was born in Luling, Texas.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Billy M. Minter</span> United States Air Force general (1926–2005)

Billy Martin Minter was a four-star general in the United States Air Force (USAF). He served as commander in chief, United States Air Forces in Europe and commander of Allied Air Forces Central Europe, with headquarters at Ramstein Air Base, West Germany.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Earl T. O'Loughlin</span> United States Air Force general

Earl Terrence O'Loughlin is a former general and commander of the Air Force Logistics Command, with headquarters at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Robert D. Russ</span> United States Air Force general (1933–1997)

Robert Dale Russ was a United States Air Force (USAF) general and commander of Tactical Air Command.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jack I. Gregory</span> General in the United States Air Force and the commander in Pacific Air Forces

Jack Irvin Gregory is a former general in the United States Air Force and the former commander in chief of the Pacific Air Forces.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Theodore S. Coberly</span> United States Air Force general

Brigadier General Theodore Simpson Coberly was an American air force brigadier general who was director of reconnaissance and electronic warfare, deputy chief of staff, research and development, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Arnold W. Braswell</span> United States Air Force general (1925–2022)

Arnold Webb Braswell was a lieutenant general in the United States Air Force (USAF) and command pilot who was commander in chief of Pacific Air Forces, with headquarters at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii. His command comprised more than 34,000 USAF operational and support personnel stationed at eight major bases and more than 87 facilities principally located in Japan, South Korea, the Philippines and Hawaii.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James M. Breedlove</span> United States Air Force general

James Montgomery Breedlove was an American air force major general who was commander, U.S. Air Force Southern Air Division of the Tactical Air Command and deputy commander in chief, United States Southern Command, Quarry Heights, Canal Zone.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Harrison Lobdell Jr.</span> United States Air Force general

Harrison Lobdell Jr. was an American Air Force major general who was commandant, National War College, National Defense University, Fort Lesley J. McNair, Washington, D.C. from 1976 to 1978.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Lynwood E. Clark</span> American Air Force lieutenant general

Lynwood Edgerton Clark was an American Air Force lieutenant general who was commander of the Alaskan Air Command, with additional duty as commander of Alaskan North American Aerospace Defense Region, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. The mission of the Alaskan Air Command is to provide top cover for America and air support in the defense of Alaska.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Avelin P. Tacon Jr.</span> United States Air Force general

Avelin Paul Tacon Jr. was an American Air Force major general.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">James R. Hildreth</span> United States Air Force general

James Robert Hildreth was a major general in the United States Air Force who served as commander of Thirteenth Air Force at Clark Air Base in the Philippines.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Craven C. Rogers Jr.</span> United States Air Force general

Craven C. Rogers Jr. was a lieutenant general in the United States Air Force who served as deputy commander in chief of the U.S. Central Command at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. The command was tasked with achieving United States national objectives in Southwest Asia, the Persian Gulf, and the Horn of Africa. Rogers was born in 1934, in Galveston, Texas. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering from the U.S. Military Academy in 1957 and a master's degree in business administration from The George Washington University. He completed Squadron Officer School in 1962 and the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in 1973. Upon graduation from the academy he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Air Force. After completing pilot training in September 1958 he was assigned to Tactical Air Command at Williams Air Force Base, Ariz., for gunnery training in the F-86F. With the phaseout of the F-86F, Rogers transferred in June 1959 as an instructor pilot to Air Training Command, Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma. He completed F-101A transition training in September 1964 and then was assigned as a tactical fighter pilot with the 91st Tactical Fighter Squadron, Royal Air Force Station Bentwaters, England. In 1965 his squadron became the first unit in the United States Air Forces in Europe to transition to the F-4. Rogers assumed duties in the Standardization and Evaluation Section of the 81st Tactical Fighter Wing at Bentwaters in November 1966. In September 1967 he transferred to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, where he completed the F-4 Fighter Weapons School. In January 1968 he was assigned to the 557th Tactical Fighter Squadron, 12th Tactical Fighter Wing, Cam Ranh Bay Air Base, South Vietnam, as a flight commander and squadron weapons officer. He subsequently served as the wing weapons officer and assistant chief of weapons and tactics for 12th Tactical Fighter Wing. He flew 255 combat missions and 435 combat flying hours in the F-4C. He returned from Southeast Asia in February 1969 and was assigned to the Fighter and Reconnaissance Manning Section, Air Force Military Personnel Center, Randolph Air Force Base, Texas. He became chief of the section in 1971. Upon graduation from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces in August 1973, Rogers became deputy commander for operations, 1st Tactical Fighter Wing, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. In June 1975 he transferred to Headquarters United States Air Force, Washington, D.C., as chief, Tactical Division, Directorate of Operational Requirements, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, Research and Development. In July 1977 Rogers was assigned as vice commander of the 4th Tactical Fighter Wing, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. In June 1978 he became commander of the wing. He returned to Air Force headquarters in July 1980 and served as military assistant to the secretary of the Air Force. From June 1983 to July 1985 he was commander of United States Air Forces Korea; commander, United Nations Command Air Component; and commander, 314th Air Division, with headquarters at Osan Air Base, South Korea. He also was commander of the Korean Air Defense Sector, director of readiness and combat operations, and chief of staff of the Air Component Command/Combined Forces Command. Rogers then transferred to Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, as vice commander in chief, Pacific Air Forces. In December 1986 Rogers returned to Osan Air Base as commander, 7th Air Force; deputy commanding general, U.S. Forces Korea (Seoul); and deputy commander in chief, United Nations Command (Seoul). He is a command pilot with 5,200 flying hours. His military awards and decorations include the Defense Distinguished Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, Distinguished Service Medal, Legion of Merit with two oak leaf clusters, Distinguished Flying Cross with oak leaf cluster, Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, Air Medal with 13 oak leaf clusters, Air Force Commendation Medal, Korean Order of National Security Merit (Chunsu) and Korean Order of National Security Merit (Kuksun). He was promoted to lieutenant general January 1, 1987, with same date of rank. He retired on April 1, 1991, and died on August 4, 2016.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 "General Timothy F. O'Keefe". United States Air Force. Archived from the original on 2012-12-12. Retrieved 28 December 2010.
  2. "Air Force Magazine". July 1984.
  3. "Burial Detail: O'Keefe, Timothy F. (Section 5, Grave 7015-1)". ANC Explorer. Arlington National Cemetery. (Official website).