Timothy H. Ball

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Timothy Horton Ball
Timothy Horton Ball.jpg
BornFebruary 16, 1826
Agawam, Hampden County, Massachusetts
DiedNovember 8, 1913
Sheffield, Colbert County, Alabama
Occupation Historian
Notable worksThe Creek War of 1813 and 1814
SpouseMartha Caroline Creighton

Timothy Horton Ball (February 16, 1826 – November 8, 1913) was an American historian, missionary, preacher, author, and teacher. He is known for writing The Creek War of 1813 and 1814. The book is a well-known source for Choctaw and Creek Indian history.

Contents

Personal life

Ball was born on February 16, 1826, in Massachusetts. Ball came from a wealthy New England family and was able to receive a baccalaureate and master's degree from Franklin College. [1] He later earned a divinity degree from Newton Theological Institution in 1863. [1]

Ball was a prolific writer. [1] As a historian, he made intricate notes with former settlers. [1] Many of his books are hundreds of pages in length. [1] His works can be found in the Library of Congress. [1]

Ball died on November 8, 1913, at Sheffield, Alabama. [1] He was buried in Clarke County, Alabama.

Works

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Halbert, H.S.; Ball, T.H. (1895). "Editor's Introduction". The Creek War of 1813 and 1814. Donuhue & Henneberry; White, Woodruff, & Fowler. p. xiv-xv.