Timothy Sullivan (Medal of Honor)

Last updated
Timothy Sullivan
Born1835
Ireland
DiedOctober 6, 1910 (aged 7475)
Place of burial
Allegiance United States
Service/branch United States Navy
Rank Coxswain
Unit USS Louisville
Battles/wars American Civil War
Awards Medal of Honor

Timothy Sullivan (1835 – October 6, 1910) was a Union Navy sailor in the American Civil War and received the U.S. military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor.

Born in 1835 in Ireland, Sullivan immigrated to the United States and was living in New York when he joined the U.S. Navy. He served during the Civil War as a coxswain on the USS Louisville. Acting as a gun captain during battle, Sullivan showed "attention to duty, bravery, and coolness" through various engagements. For these actions, he was awarded the Medal of Honor on April 3, 1863. [1] [2]

Sullivan's official Medal of Honor citation reads:

Served on board the U.S.S. Louisville during various actions of that vessel. During the engagements of the Louisville, Sullivan served as first captain of a 9-inch gun and throughout his period of service was "especially commended for his attention to duty, bravery, and coolness in action." [2]

Sullivan died on October 6, 1910, at age 74 or 75 and was buried at Los Angeles National Cemetery in Los Angeles, California. [1] [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Timothy Sullivan". Hall of Valor. Military Times . Retrieved January 17, 2013.
  2. 1 2 "Civil War Medal of Honor Recipients (M–Z)". Medal of Honor Citations. United States Army Center of Military History. June 26, 2011. Retrieved January 17, 2013.
  3. Holt, Dean W. (2010). American Military Cemeteries. Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company. p. 80. ISBN   9780786440238.