Timur Beg

Last updated
Timur Beg
تیمور بیگ
Timur Beg (crop).jpg
Shah
In office
1933–1933
Personal details
Born1886
Kucha, Qing Dynasty
Died9 August 1933 (aged 46–47)
Kashgar, Republic of China
Nationality Chinese
Political partyFlag of the First East Turkestan Republic.svg Young Kashgar Party

Timur Beg (Uyghur : تیمور بیگ), also known as Timur Sijan (division general), was a Uighur rebel military leader in Xinjiang in 1933. He was involved in the 1933 Battle of Kashgar and participated before in Turpan Rebellion (1932). He associated with the Turkic nationalist Young Kashgar Party and appointed himself as "Timur Shah". [1] He and other Uighurs like the Bughra brothers wanted to secede from China. In August 1933 his troops were attacked by the Chinese Muslim 36th Division of the National Revolutionary Army under General Ma Zhancang. Timur was shot and killed in Kashgar. [2] [3]

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References

  1. Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 83. ISBN   0-521-25514-7 . Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  2. S. Frederick Starr (2004). Xinjiang: China's Muslim borderland. M.E. Sharpe. p. 77. ISBN   0-7656-1318-2 . Retrieved 2010-06-28.
  3. Andrew D. W. Forbes (1986). Warlords and Muslims in Chinese Central Asia: a political history of Republican Sinkiang 1911-1949. Cambridge, England: CUP Archive. p. 93. ISBN   0-521-25514-7 . Retrieved 2010-06-28.