Tinea svenssoni

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Tinea svenssoni
Tinea svenssoni.JPG
Scientific classification OOjs UI icon edit-ltr.svg
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Tineidae
Genus: Tinea
Species:
T. svenssoni
Binomial name
Tinea svenssoni
Opheim, 1965
Synonyms
  • Acedes svenssoniHübner, 1825
  • Autoses svenssoniHübner, 1825
  • Dystinea svenssoniBörner, 1925
  • Tineopis svenssoniZagulajev, 1960

Tinea svenssoni is a moth of the family Tineidae. It is found in northern Europe (Norway, Sweden, Finland, the Baltic region), Russia, as well as North America where has been recorded from Québec.

The wingspan is 13–18 millimetres (0.51–0.71 in). Difficult to distinguish from Tinea pellionella , Tinea columbariella and Tinea dubiella but the genitalia are diagnostic.

The larvae live in bird nests, typically in the nests of cavity-nesting species, such as tits and owls. [1]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tineidae</span> Family of moths

Tineidae is a family of moths in the order Lepidoptera described by Pierre André Latreille in 1810. Collectively, they are known as fungus moths or tineid moths. The family contains considerably more than 3,000 species in more than 300 genera. Most of the tineid moths are small or medium-sized, with wings held roofwise over the body when at rest. They are particularly common in the Palaearctic, but many occur elsewhere, and some are found very widely as introduced species.

<i>Tineola bisselliella</i> Species of moth

Tineola bisselliella, known as the common clothes moth, webbing clothes moth, or simply clothing moth, is a species of fungus moth. It is the type species of its genus Tineola and was first described by the Swedish entomologist Arvid David Hummel in 1823. The specific name is commonly misspelled biselliella – for example by G. A. W. Herrich-Schäffer, when he established Tineola in 1853.

<i>Nemapogon granella</i> Species of moth

Nemapogon granella is a species of tineoid moth. It belongs to the fungus moth family (Tineidae), and therein to the subfamily Nemapogoninae. It is the type species of its genus Nemapogon, and via that also of the subfamily Nemapogoninae. It is also the type species of the proposed genera Brosis and Diaphthirusa, which are consequently junior objective synonyms of Nemapogon.

<i>Triaxomera parasitella</i> Species of moth

Triaxomera parasitella is a species of tineoid moth. It belongs to the fungus moth family (Tineidae), and therein to the subfamily Nemapogoninae. It is widespread and common in much of western Eurasia, but seems to be absent from some more outlying regions, such as Portugal and the eastern Baltic, Ireland and Iceland. It has also not been recorded from Slovenia but given that it is found in neighboring countries, it may well occur there unnoticed. Recently, the species was recorded from British Columbia. Generally, it is a moth of warm temperate regions, e.g. in Great Britain it is only a rare and scarce species from the English Midlands northwards.

<i>Tinea semifulvella</i> Species of moth

Tinea semifulvella is a species of tineoid moth. It belongs to the fungus moth family (Tineidae), and therein to the nominate subfamily Tineinae. It is widespread and common in much of the western Palearctic, but seems to be absent from Portugal and the Balkans as well as the outlying islands. The nocturnal adults are on the wing around May to September, depending on the location, and are easily attracted to light sources.

<i>Tinea pellionella</i> Species of moth

Tinea pellionella, the case-bearing clothes moth, is a species of tineoid moth in the family Tineidae, the fungus moths. This species has a cosmopolitan distribution, occurring nearly worldwide.

<i>Niditinea fuscella</i> Species of moth

The brown-dotted clothes moth is a species of tineoid moth. It belongs to the fungus moth family (Tineidae), and therein to the nominate subfamily Tineinae. It is the type species of its genus Niditinea.

Wyoma is a small genus of the fungus moth family, Tineidae. Therein, it belongs to the subfamily Tineinae. It is probably fairly closely related to the type genus of its family and subfamily, Tinea, and can be most easily separated by the wing venation – in Tinea, two veins in each wing arise from a common stalk, whereas none do in Wyoma.

<i>Monopis laevigella</i> Species of moth

Monopis laevigella, the skin moth, is a species of tineoid moth. It belongs to the fungus moth family (Tineidae), and therein to the nominate subfamily Tineinae. It is the type species of the genus Monopis and its junior objective synonym Hyalospila. As with the common clothes moth, earlier authors frequently misapplied the name Tinea vestianella to the present species.

<i>Tinea trinotella</i> Species of moth

Tinea trinotella is a species of tineoid moth. It belongs to the fungus moth family (Tineidae), and therein to the nominate subfamily Tineinae. It was once used as type species of a distinct genus Acedes, but this is synonymized today with Tinea, the type genus of Tineinae, Tineidae and the superfamily Tineoidea.

<i>Tinea</i> (moth) Genus of moths

Tinea is a genus of the fungus moth family, Tineidae. Therein, it belongs to the subfamily Tineinae. As evident by its name, it is the type genus of its subfamily and family. Established as one of the first subgroups of "Phalaena", it used to contain many species of Tineidae that are nowadays placed in other genera, as well as a few moths nowadays placed elsewhere.

Phereoeca allutella, the household case-bearing moth, belongs to the subfamily Tineinae of the fungus moth family (Tineidae). It was first described by Hans Rebel in 1892. It is an occasional pest of furs, flannel and similar materials, and has been inadvertently introduced to many places it is not originally native to.

<i>Monopis crocicapitella</i> Species of moth

Monopis crocicapitella, the pale-backed clothes moth, is a moth of the family Tineidae described by James Brackenridge Clemens in 1859. It has a nearly cosmopolitan distribution. It was first described from the eastern United States. It is particularly destructive of fabric and clothes.

<i>Micropterix tunbergella</i> Species of moth

Micropterix tunbergella is a moth of the family Micropterigidae found in most of Europe. The moths are very small and can be found feeding on the pollen of hawthorn, oak and sycamore. The larva and pupa are unknown. The moth was described Johan Christian Fabricius in 1787.

<i>Tinea pallescentella</i> Species of moth

Tinea pallescentella, the large pale clothes moth, is a moth of the family Tineidae. It is found in most of Europe. It is also present in western North America, where it has been recorded from California. There are also records from South America and Australia.

<i>Ochromolopis</i> Genus of moths

Ochromolopis is a genus of moths in the family Epermeniidae described by Jacob Hübner in 1824.

<i>Tinea columbariella</i> Species of moth

Tinea columbariella is a moth belonging to the family Tineidae. The species was first described by Wocke in 1877.

Tinea flavescentella is a species of moth belonging to the family Tineidae. It is native to Western Europe. The wingspan is 8–17 mm. Head with pale yellow hair tuts. Antennae just over half the front wing length. The forewings are greyish yellow with two or three grey-brown spots and a faint hyaline spot at the base. Hindwings grey. Certain identification requires examination of the genitalia. Flies at night in August. It is found indoors where fur and wool goods are kept.

Tinea dubiella is a species of moth belonging to the family Tineidae.

<i>Tinea occidentella</i> A species of moth

Tinea occidentella is a species of moth of the family Tineidae. It has a relatively large forewing from ca. 7–12 mm (0.28–0.47 in). The moth is dark grey with lighter central region of the forewing within which a darker spot or fleck is prominent. The common name “western clothes moth” is a misnomer as it does not eat clothes but only scat and pellets. It is common near the Pacific coast from the San Francisco Bay region through coastal northern Baja California. It is virtually restricted to coastal areas of high humidity derived from advective fog off the sea. The larvae feed upon upon keratin of fur and feathers in mammalian carnivore scat and in pellets of birds of prey. They are also reported to develop upon bird carcasses. The larval foods are very low in water, and keratin itself contains no water. The larvae obtain their water via that absorbed from the atmosphere of their high humidity environment by the fur and feathers of their diet.

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