Tinta Cão

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Tinta Cão
Grape (Vitis)
Tinta Cao leaf.JPG
Tinta Cão leaf
Color of berry skinNoir
Species Vitis vinifera
Also calledCastellana Negra
Origin Douro
VIVC number 12500

Tinta Cão is a red Portuguese wine grape variety that has been grown primarily in the Douro region since the sixteenth century. The vine produces very low yields which has led it close to extinction despite the high quality of wine that it can produce. Improvements in bilateral cordon training and experiments at University of California, Davis have helped to sustain the variety. [1] The vine favors cooler climates and can add finesse and complexity to a wine blend. [2]

Contents

Synonyms

Spanish synonyms include Castellana Negra.

See also

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References

  1. J. Robinson Vines, Grapes & Wines pg 216 Mitchell Beazley 1986 ISBN   1-85732-999-6
  2. T. Stevenson "The Sotheby's Wine Encyclopedia" pg 335 Dorling Kindersley 2005 ISBN   0-7566-1324-8