Tintin and I

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Tintin et moi
Tintin and I
Tintin et moi poster small.jpg
Film poster for 'Tintin et Moi'
Directed byAnders Høgsbro Østergaard
Written byAnders Høgsbro Østergaard
Starring Hergé
Release date
2003
Running time
75 minutes
Languages French
English
Danish

Tintin and I (French: Tintin et moi, also known as Tintin and Me) is a 2003 documentary by Anders Høgsbro Østergaard, about Belgian writer-artist Georges Remi, better known as Hergé, and his creation Tintin. The film is a co-production of Denmark, Belgium, France, and Switzerland.

Contents

The film is based on Numa Sadoul's revealing interviews with Hergé from the 1970s, and goes into detail about Hergé's life and how the success of Tintin affected it. The film is based strongly around Hergé's experiences and state of mental health leading up to the writing of Tintin in Tibet , often heralded as Hergé's most personal album. The history of Tintin is examined through Hergé's life and the way that he was affected by the growing popularity of his character.

Theme

The underlying theme of the film is the way that Hergé's private life affected his work; for example, Bianca Castafiore is a subconscious (or perhaps conscious) reflection of Georges' first wife, Germaine, and the way that Captain Haddock responds to her reflects the way Georges often felt towards his wife. Specifically, the mothering instinct that Germaine had toward him is shown most explicitly in The Castafiore Emerald . The subject of religion is also discussed, including Georges' gradual disillusioned view of the Catholic church, and the opposition he came up against due to Wolff's sacrifice in Explorers on the Moon . The influence of Chang on Georges' work is also highlighted, using reconstructed footage and actual archive footage of their meeting in 1934.

Format

Technically, the film employed a choice of graphic effects to "re-animate" video footage of Hergé speaking, to match up with the audio being played (from the interviews conducted with Sadoul). Panels from the albums were also animated to allow movement through them, the plane crash from Tintin in Tibet and the Shanghai street scene from The Blue Lotus both being used in such a manner. Interviews are reconstructed using actors, but the viewer never sees their faces; hands and arms are used, holding the albums, flicking through them, drinking tea and the like.

Broadcast

The film has been broadcast in the UK on BBC Four [1] and in the US on PBS. [2]

DVD releases

In Australia, Madman Entertainment released a DVD version of Tintin and I in 2007, packaged with I, Tintin , an interview with Gérard Valet, a short film called The Secret of the Clear Line and a menu-based Hergé biography.

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hergé</span> Belgian cartoonist (1907–1983)

Georges Prosper Remi, known by the pen name Hergé, from the French pronunciation of his reversed initials RG, was a Belgian comic strip artist. He is best known for creating The Adventures of Tintin, the series of comic albums which are considered one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. He was also responsible for two other well-known series, Quick & Flupke (1930–1940) and The Adventures of Jo, Zette and Jocko (1936–1957). His works were executed in his distinctive ligne claire drawing style.

<i>The Adventures of Tintin</i> Series of 24 comic albums by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

The Adventures of Tintin is a series of 24 bande dessinée albums created by Belgian cartoonist Georges Remi, who wrote under the pen name Hergé. The series was one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. By 2007, a century after Hergé's birth in 1907, Tintin had been published in more than 70 languages with sales of more than 200 million copies, and had been adapted for radio, television, theatre, and film.

<i>King Ottokars Sceptre</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

King Ottokar's Sceptre is the eighth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Commissioned by the conservative Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle for its children's supplement Le Petit Vingtième, it was serialised weekly from August 1938 to August 1939. Hergé intended the story as a satirical criticism of the expansionist policies of Nazi Germany, in particular the annexation of Austria in March 1938. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who travel to the fictional Balkan nation of Syldavia, where they combat a plot to overthrow the monarchy of King Muskar XII.

<i>Tintin and Alph-Art</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Tintin and Alph-Art is the unfinished twenty-fourth and final volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Left incomplete on Hergé's death, the manuscript was posthumously published in 1986. The story revolves around Brussels' modern art scene, where the young reporter Tintin discovers that a local art dealer has been murdered. Investigating further, he encounters a conspiracy of art forgery, masterminded by a religious teacher named Endaddine Akass.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bianca Castafiore</span> Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Bianca Castafiore, nicknamed the "Milanese Nightingale", is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. She is an opera singer who frequently pops up in adventure after adventure. While famous and revered the world over, most of the main characters find her voice shrill and appallingly loud, most notably Captain Haddock, who ironically is the object of Castafiore's affections. She also has a habit of mispronouncing everyone's names, with the exception of Tintin and her personal assistants. Castafiore is comically portrayed as narcissistic, whimsical, absent-minded, and talkative, but often shows a more generous and essentially amiable side, in addition to a will of iron.

<i>The Castafiore Emerald</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

The Castafiore Emerald is the twenty-first volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It was serialised weekly from July 1961 to September 1962 in Tintin magazine. In contrast to the previous Tintin books, Hergé deliberately broke the adventure formula he had created: it is the only book in the series where the characters remain at Marlinspike Hall, Captain Haddock's family estate, and neither travel abroad nor confront dangerous criminals. The plot concerns the visit of the opera singer Bianca Castafiore and the subsequent theft of her emerald.

<i>Flight 714 to Sydney</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Flight 714 to Sydney is the twenty-second volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It was serialised weekly from September 1966 to November 1967 in Tintin magazine. The title refers to a flight that Tintin and his friends fail to catch, as they become embroiled in their arch-nemesis Rastapopoulos' plot to kidnap an eccentric millionaire from a supersonic business jet on a Sondonesian island.

<i>The Crab with the Golden Claws</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

The Crab with the Golden Claws is the ninth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The story was serialised weekly in Le Soir Jeunesse, the children's supplement to Le Soir, Belgium's leading francophone newspaper, from October 1940 to October 1941 amidst the German occupation of Belgium during World War II. Partway through serialisation, Le Soir Jeunesse was cancelled and the story began to be serialised daily in the pages of Le Soir. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who travel to Morocco to pursue a gang of international opium smugglers. The story marks the first appearance of main character Captain Haddock.

<i>Tintin in Tibet</i> Comic album by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Tintin in Tibet is the twentieth volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. It was serialised weekly from September 1958 to November 1959 in Tintin magazine and published as a book in 1960. Hergé considered it his favourite Tintin adventure and an emotional effort, as he created it while suffering from traumatic nightmares and a personal conflict while deciding to leave his wife of three decades for a younger woman. The story tells of the young reporter Tintin in search of his friend Chang Chong-Chen, who the authorities claim has died in a plane crash in the Himalayas. Convinced that Chang has survived and accompanied only by Snowy, Captain Haddock and the Sherpa guide Tharkey, Tintin crosses the Himalayas to the plateau of Tibet, along the way encountering the mysterious Yeti.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jolyon Wagg</span> Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Jolyon Wagg is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is a gregarious, simple, and overbearing man who enters the story by barging in uninvited.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Professor Calculus</span> Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Professor Cuthbert Calculus is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is Tintin's friend, an absent-minded professor and half-deaf physicist, who invents many sophisticated devices used in the series, such as a one-person shark-shaped submarine, the Moon rocket, and an ultrasound weapon. Calculus's deafness is a frequent source of humour, as he repeats back what he thinks he has heard, usually in the most unlikely words possible. He does not admit to being near-deaf and insists he is only a little hard of hearing in one ear, making use of an ear trumpet to hear better.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Tintin (character)</span> Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Tintin is the titular protagonist of The Adventures of Tintin, the comic series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The character was created in 1929 and introduced in Le Petit Vingtième, a weekly youth supplement to the Belgian newspaper Le Vingtième Siècle. Appearing as a young man with a round face and quiff hairstyle, Tintin is depicted as a precocious, multitalented reporter who travels the world with his dog Snowy.

<i>I, Tintin</i> 1976 documentary about the comics series

I, Tintin is a Franco-Belgian film which premiered in the Paris cinema as a feature presentation in 1976. It is made in semidocumentary style and mixing interviews with The Adventures of Tintin creator Hergé with real historical events and news stories edited together with animated Adventures of Tintin clips, narrated by Belgian news correspondent, Gérard Valet. The film was produced by Belvision Studios and Pierre Films in cooperation with the Franco-Belgian Ministry of Culture.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Numa Sadoul</span>

Numa Sadoul (born 7 May 1947, Brazzaville, French Equatorial Africa is a French writer, actor, and director, who has been a resident of France since 1966.

The Studios Hergé were, between 1950 and 1986, a SARL company consisting of Belgian cartoonist Hergé and his collaborators, who assisted him with the creation of The Adventures of Tintin and derived products. Over the years, the studios had between 12 and 50 employees, including some prestigious artists like Jacques Martin, Bob de Moor and Roger Leloup.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Captain Haddock</span> Comic character by Belgian cartoonist Hergé

Captain Archibald Haddock is a fictional character in The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. He is one of Tintin's best friends, a seafaring pipe-smoking Merchant Marine Captain.

Tintin in India or The Mystery of the Blue Diamond, is a 1941 Belgian theatre piece in three acts written by Hergé and Jacques Van Melkebeke. It features Hergé's famous character, Tintin, and covers much of the second half of Cigars of the Pharaoh as Tintin attempts to rescue a stolen blue diamond. The events of the story occur within the chronology of Tintin stories, between The Crab with the Golden Claws and The Shooting Star.

References

  1. "BBC Four - Tintin and Me". BBC. Retrieved 29 December 2011.
  2. "PBS - Tintin and I". PBS. Retrieved 29 April 2015.