Tintin and the Temple of the Sun

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Tintin and the Temple of the Sun
Tintin and the Temple of the Sun-movie poster.png
Theatrical release poster
Directed byEddie Lateste
Screenplay byEddie Lateste
Jos Marissen
László Molnár
Hergé
Dialogue by Greg
Based on The Seven Crystal Balls
Prisoners of the Sun
by Hergé
Produced by Raymond Leblanc
CinematographyFrançois Léonard
Edited byLászló Mola
Music byFrançois Rauber
Songs:
Jacques Brel
Production
companies
Dargaud Films
Belvision Studios
Distributed byParafrance Films
Release date
  • 13 December 1969 (1969-12-13)(France)
Running time
77 minutes
Countries France
Belgium
Switzerland
Language French

Tintin and the Temple of the Sun (original title Tintin et le temple du soleil) is a 1969 animated film produced by Belvision Studios. [1] A co-production between Belgium, France and Switzerland, it is an adaptation of Hergé's two-part Tintin adventure The Seven Crystal Balls and Prisoners of the Sun .

Contents

Production

Coming after the success of the Belvision cartoon series, Hergé's Adventures of Tintin , there was a lot of publicity for the movie (which was the first of two animated films, the second being 1972's Tintin and the Lake of Sharks ). Jacques Brel, a fan of the series, contributed two songs to the soundtrack, entitled Chanson de Zorrino and Ode a la Nuit.

Plot

When seven archaeologists find an old Inca mummy, they become the victims of an Inca curse. Back in Europe, they fall into a deep sleep one by one and only once a day, at the same time, do they wake up for a few minutes and have hallucinations of the Inca god. The story begins with the sixth archaeologist falling asleep by the contents of a crystal ball thrown into his car by Incas.

Professor Tarragon stays with Tintin, Snowy and Captain Haddock in Marlinspike Hall, when the Thompsons arrive, Tarragon learns from them that he is the last Councious Professor. A thunderstorm approaches and the lights go out. This is used by the Incas to put the last one in sleep and to capture Professor Calculus, who has proved to be a desecrater of the sanctuary by putting on the bracelet of the Inca sun god.

His friends Tintin and Haddock follow the track to Peru, up to the mountains through snow and jungle and finally discover the Temple of the Sun, where they are caught. Their only choice is to choose the day on which they want to be burned to death by the sun. Tintin chooses wisely and is able use an eclipse. At the end he achieves forgiveness, the archaeologists are cured from their curse and Calculus is released.

Cast

CharacterOriginalEnglish
Tintin Philippe Ogouz Michael Williams
Captain Haddock Claude Bertrand Peter Hawkins
Zorrino Lucie DolèneUnknown
ChiquitoGeorges Atlas
The beefy mustache attacking ZorrinoAlbert Augier
The witness stammers at St. NazaireJacques Balutin
Peruvian commissionerJean-Henri Chambois
A bandit on the boatHenry Djanik
The Santa Clara station masterGérard Hernandez
The policeman in the radio control roomJean-Louis Jemma
MaitaLinette Lemercier
Jauga station masterSerge Lhorca
One of the 7 scholarsJacques Marin
The great Inca, father of Princess MaïtaJean Michaud
Nestor Bernard Musson
The speaker, presenter of the expedition of the 7 scientistsRoland Ménard
The doctor of the 7 scientistsSerge Nadaud
A bandit with a knife in the mountain
An Inca guard
Professor CalculusFred Pasquali Geoffrey Bayldon
Thompson Guy Piérauld Ronald Lacey
Thomson Paul Rieger John Clive
Professor TarragonAndré Valmy Robert Brown
One of the 7 scholarsHenri VirlojeuxUnknown

Additional Voices

Changes from the books

Many scenes from the source books are deleted; in fact the whole of The Seven Crystal Balls is condensed into twenty minutes of film. Events were changed and some are added. For example, the Prince of the Sun's daughter is introduced, who tries to beg her father to spare the prisoners (and likes Zorrino). Also, Thomson and Thompson accompany Tintin and Captain Haddock on their quest to rescue Professor Calculus, whereas in the books their only role is attempting to use dowsing in order to find Tintin and his friends (and their arrival in the Incan village delays the planned execution).

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References

  1. "10 Best Movie References in the French Dispatch". Screen Rant . 28 November 2021.