Tiny Cahoon

Last updated
Tiny Cahoon
No. 10, 30, 40
Position: Tackle
Personal information
Born:(1900-05-22)May 22, 1900
Baraboo, Wisconsin, U.S.
Died:February 3, 1973(1973-02-03) (aged 72)
San Francisco, California, U.S.
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High school: Baraboo (WI)
College: Montana, Gonzaga
Career history
Career highlights and awards
  • Gonzaga Athletic Hall of Fame (1991) [1]
Career NFL statistics
Games played:31
Games started:27
Touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com  ·  PFR

Ivan Wells "Tiny" Cahoon (May 22, 1900 February 3, 1973) was an American football player and coach. He played professionally as a tackle for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) from 1926 to 1929. He played college football at the University of Montana and at Gonzaga University. [2] [3]

Contents

Biography

Cahoon was born on May 22, 1900, in Baraboo, Wisconsin. [4] He played college football under head coach Gus Dorais at Gonzaga, and was part of the school's undefeated team in 1924. After graduating from Gonzaga in 1925, Cahoon taught and coached at Libby High School in Montana for a year, [5] then played pro football. [6] [7] He was a tackle for the Green Bay Packers for four seasons from 1926 until 1929, when a knee injury ended his playing career. He coached high school football at West De Pere in Wisconsin while a pro player, [8] moved to Green Bay West High School in 1933, and to Monmouth College in Illinois in 1938. [2] [3]

Cahoon moved to the professional Milwaukee Chiefs, a new team in the American Football League in 1940 and 1941, [9] then entered the United States Army during World War II, and coached football service teams. In 1951, he returned to Gonzaga University as an ROTC instructor. [10]

Head coaching record

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Monmouth Fighting Scots (Midwest Conference)(1938–1939)
1938 Monmouth5–52–3T–5th
1939 Monmouth6–2–22–2–2T–4th
Monmouth:11–7–24–5–2
Total:11–7–2

See also

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References

  1. "Ivan Cahoon". Gonzaga University. Retrieved December 17, 2009.
  2. 1 2 "Ex-Packer Cahoon dies". Milwaukee Sentinel. UPI. February 6, 1973. p. 2, part 2.
  3. 1 2 "Former Packer, Cahoon, is dead". Milwaukee Journal. UPI. February 6, 1973. p. 8, part 2.
  4. "Tiny Cahoon Stats". Pro-Football-Reference.com .
  5. "Miss Grove bride of "Tiny" Cahoon". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. July 1, 1926. p. 6.
  6. "Cahoon to join Green Bay club". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. August 24, 1926. p. 14.
  7. Ashlock, Herb (August 28, 1953). "Tiny Cahoon remembers pro football way back when iron man gridders were once common in the game". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. p. 13.
  8. "Packers sign new players". Milwaukee Journal. July 22, 1928. p. 3, sports.
  9. "And Tiny Cahoon appreciates it". Milwaukee Journal. (photo). October 19, 1941. p. 3, sports.
  10. "Once a Gonzaga grid star, then a pro mentor, he's back as ROTC instructor and likes it". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. October 2, 1951. p. 6.