Tiorati Brook Road

Last updated

Tiorati Brook Parkway

Tiorati Brook Road
Tiorati Brook Road highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by Palisades Interstate Park Commission
Length3.6 mi [1]  (5.8 km)
Major junctions
West endArden Valley Pkwy Shield.svgSeven Lakes Pkwy Shield.svg Arden Valley Road  / Seven Lakes Drive in Harriman State Park
East endLake Welch Pkwy Shield.svgPalisades Pkwy Shield.svg Lake Welch Parkway  / Palisades Parkway in Harriman State Park
Location
Country United States
State New York
Counties Orange, Rockland
Highway system

Tiorati Brook Road is an east-west parkway located within Harriman State Park in southern New York in the United States. The highway extends for 3.6 miles (5.8 km) between Tiorati Circle, a traffic circle connecting Tiorati Brook Road to Seven Lakes Drive in Orange County, and an interchange with the Lake Welch Parkway just west of where that parkway ends at the Palisades Interstate Parkway in Rockland County. The road crosses over the county line roughly midway between the two locations. Tiorati Brook Road is owned and maintained by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission.

Contents

The road, once known as Cedar Ponds Road, was first spotted in a map of Rockland County by David Barr in 1839. The route was taken over by the county of Rockland in 1899 until 1915, when the Palisades Park Interstate Commission took over the highway. The group paved the rugged route through Harriman State Park with gravel in 1915, widening it a year later. In 1931, the route was paved from Tiorati Circle to NY 210 (now County Route 106). Since 1931, the route has been truncated twice: once for construction of the Palisades Interstate Parkway and later for the construction of Lake Welch Parkway.

Route description

Tiorati Brook Road begins at the Tiorati Circle on Seven Lakes Drive. TBRWesternBegin.jpg
Tiorati Brook Road begins at the Tiorati Circle on Seven Lakes Drive.

Tiorati Brook Road begins at Tiorati Circle, a traffic circle at the north end of Lake Tiorati in Harriman State Park. Here, the road connects to Seven Lakes Drive and the eastern terminus of Arden Valley Road. The highway heads southeast from the junction, running along the northeastern edge of Lake Tiorati as it passes by the dense forests that comprise most of Harriman State Park. [1] After 1 mile (1.6 km), the highway serves the Tiorati Workshop, a collaboration between the State Park and Bank Street College of Education, located adjacent to the eastern lake shore. [2] Past the workshop, the road takes on a more southerly routing and descends down a hill before crossing Tiorati Brook by way of a dam. Just south of the dam is Day Camp in the Park, where Tiorati Brook Road turns back to the east to follow its namesake waterway away from the lake. [1]

For the next 2 miles (3.2 km), the highway meanders southeastward across the park's sprawling forests, intersecting no other roads of note. During this stretch, the road passes from Orange County to Rockland County. It eventually ends at a wye interchange with Lake Welch Parkway, where the road merges into the northbound direction of the parkway. The southbound connection is made by way of a northbound to southbound U-turn a short distance to the east. The interchange lies just west of Lake Welch Parkway's northern terminus at Palisades Interstate Parkway exit 16, a partial interchange lacking a connection between Lake Welch Parkway northbound and Palisades Parkway northbound. [1]

History

The roadway that would later become Tiorati Brook Road dates back to records from a map of Rockland County in 1839 by David Barr. Known as the Cedar Ponds Road, the road was acquired by the county in 1899, and in 1907, when a report to the county was made, the route was in really poor condition for their roads. [3] Topographical maps dating as far back as 1910 show Tiorati Brook Road as a local road reaching as far east as what is today the intersection of Gate Hill Road (Rockland CR 106) and Cedar Falls Road (CR 69), east of the Palisades Interstate Parkway. [4]

In May 1915, the Palisades Interstate Park Commission took over maintenance of the road, which ran from the dam at Cedar Ponds to the village of Stony Point. In 1916, the Commission widened the road to 26 feet (7.9 m) of gravel. Fifteen years later, the Commission paved the roadway with asphalt from Tiorati Circle to the junction with NY 210 (designated the prior year, now CR-106). In 1953, construction of the Palisades Interstate Parkway caused the road to be truncated in a local section called Pingyp. The final truncation to Tiorati Brook Road occurred in 1971 with construction of the Lake Welch Parkway (originally Lake Welch Drive), which ate a 0.5 miles (0.80 km) long section. [3]

Major intersections

CountyLocationmi [1] kmDestinationsNotes
Orange Harriman State Park 0.000.00West plate brown.svg
Arden Valley Pkwy Shield.svg
Seven Lakes Pkwy Shield.svgTo plate.svg
US 6.svg
To plate brown.svg
Palisades Pkwy Shield.svg
Arden Valley Road west / Seven Lakes Drive to US 6  / Palisades Parkway  Bear Mountain, Lake Kanawauke, Lake Sebago, Lake Welch, Sloatsburg
Tiorati Circle; eastern terminus of Arden Valley Road
Rockland 3.605.79Lake Welch Pkwy Shield.svgSouth plate brown.svg
Palisades Pkwy Shield.svg
Lake Welch Parkway  / Palisades Parkway south
Interchange
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Related Research Articles

The Bronx River Parkway is a 19.12-mile (30.77 km) limited-access parkway in downstate New York in the United States. It is named for the nearby Bronx River, which it parallels. The southern terminus of the parkway is at Story Avenue near the Bruckner Expressway in the Bronx neighborhood of Soundview. The northern terminus is at Kensico Circle in North Castle, Westchester County, where the parkway connects to the Taconic State Parkway and, via a short connector, New York State Route 22 (NY 22). Within the Bronx, the parkway is maintained by the New York State Department of Transportation and is designated New York State Route 907H (NY 907H), an unsigned reference route. In Westchester County, the parkway is maintained by the Westchester County Department of Public Works and is designated unsigned County Route 9987 (CR 9987).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">U.S. Route 46</span> Highway in New Jersey

U.S. Route 46 (US 46) is an east–west U.S. Highway completely within the state of New Jersey, running for 75.34 mi (121.25 km), making it the shortest signed, non-spur U.S. Highway. The west end is at an interchange with Interstate 80 (I-80) and Route 94 in Columbia, Warren County, on the Delaware River. The east end is in the middle of the George Washington Bridge over the Hudson River in Fort Lee, Bergen County, while the route is concurrent with I-95 and US 1-9. Throughout much of its length, US 46 is closely paralleled by I-80. US 46 is a major local and suburban route, with some sections built to or near freeway standards and many other sections arterials with jughandles. The route runs through several communities in the northern part of New Jersey, including Hackettstown, Netcong, Dover, Parsippany-Troy Hills, Wayne, Clifton, Ridgefield Park, Palisades Park, and Fort Lee. It crosses over the Upper Passaic River at several points. The road has been ceremonially named the United Spanish–American War Veterans Memorial Highway.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Palisades Interstate Parkway</span> United States historic place

The Palisades Interstate Parkway (PIP) is a 38.25-mile (61.56 km) controlled-access parkway in the U.S. states of New Jersey and New York. The parkway is a major commuter route into New York City from Rockland and Orange counties in New York and Bergen County in New Jersey. The southern terminus of the route is at the George Washington Bridge in Fort Lee, New Jersey, where it connects to Interstate 95 (I-95), US 1-9, and US 46. Its northern terminus is at a traffic circle in Fort Montgomery, New York, where the PIP meets US 9W and US 202 at the Bear Mountain Bridge. At exit 18, the PIP forms a concurrency with US 6 for the remaining duration of its run.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Interstate 287</span> Interstate Highway in New Jersey and New York

Interstate 287 (I-287) is an auxiliary Interstate Highway in the US states of New Jersey and New York. It is a partial beltway around New York City, serving northern New Jersey and the counties of Rockland and Westchester in New York. I-287, which is signed north–south in New Jersey and east–west in New York, follows a roughly horseshoe-shaped route from the New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) in Edison, New Jersey, clockwise to the New England Thruway (I-95) in Rye, New York, for 98.72 miles (158.87 km). Through New Jersey, I-287 runs west from its southern terminus in Edison through suburban areas. In Bridgewater Township, the freeway takes a more northeasterly course, paralleled by US Route 202 (US 202). The northernmost part of I-287 in New Jersey passes through mountainous surroundings. After crossing into New York at Suffern, I-287 turns east on the New York State Thruway (I-87) and runs through Rockland County. After crossing the Hudson River on the Tappan Zee Bridge, I-287 splits from I-87 near Tarrytown and continues east through Westchester County on the Cross-Westchester Expressway until it reaches the New England Thruway. Within New Jersey, I-287 is maintained by the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT), and, within New York, it is maintained by the New York State Thruway Authority (NYSTA).

At 47,527 acres (192.33 km2), Harriman State Park is the second largest state park in the U.S. state of New York. Located in Rockland and Orange counties 30 miles (48 km) north of New York City, it is a haven for hikers with over 200 miles (320 km) of hiking trails. The park is also known for its 31 lakes, multiple streams, public camping area, and great vistas. The park's hiking trails are currently maintained by volunteers from the New York - New Jersey Trail Conference.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Palisades Interstate Park Commission</span> United States historic place

The Palisades Interstate Park Commission (PIPC) was formed in 1900 by Governors Theodore Roosevelt of New York and Foster Voorhees of New Jersey in response to the quarrying operations along the Palisades Cliffs of New Jersey. The Palisades, a National Natural Landmark that are also called the New Jersey Palisades or the Hudson River Palisades, are a line of steep cliffs along the west side of the lower Hudson River in Northeastern New Jersey and Southeastern New York in the United States. After its formation, the PIPC quickly moved to acquire the lands at the base of the Palisades to stop quarrying operations in both New York and New Jersey. The commission consists of ten commissioners, five appointed by each governor, and was ratified by an Act of Congress in 1937 when its interstate compact was approved. Today, the Commission owns and operates more than 125,000 acres of public parkland in New York and New Jersey including 21 state parks, 8 historic sites, and the Palisades Interstate Parkway. These parks are visited by more than 7 million people annually.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New York State Route 129</span> State highway in Westchester County, New York, US

New York State Route 129 (NY 129) is a 7.75-mile (12.47 km) long state highway in the western part of Westchester County, New York. The route begins at New York State Route 9A in the village of Croton on Hudson at the Hudson River. NY 129 then travels through the towns of Cortlandt and Yorktown, running along the northern edge of the New Croton Reservoir. It passes under (southbound) and over (northbound) the Taconic State Parkway in Yorktown with no direct interchange. NY 129 ends in Yorktown at an intersection with NY 118.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New York State Route 59</span> State highway in Rockland County, New York, US

New York State Route 59 (NY 59) is an east–west state highway in southern Rockland County, New York, in the United States. The route extends for 14.08 miles (22.66 km) from NY 17 in Hillburn to U.S. Route 9W (US 9W) in Nyack. In Suffern, it has a concurrency with US 202 for 0.05 miles (0.08 km). NY 59 runs parallel to the New York State Thruway its entire route. The routing of NY 59 became a state highway in 1911 and was signed as NY 59 in the late 1920s.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New York State Route 340</span> State highway in Rockland County, New York, US

New York State Route 340 (NY 340) is a 3.10-mile (4.99 km) state highway in southeastern Rockland County, New York, in the United States. Though it is signed as an east–west route, it actually follows a north–south alignment. The southern terminus of the route is at the New Jersey state line in Palisades, where it becomes County Route 501 (CR 501). The northern terminus is at an intersection with NY 303 in Orangeburg; however, according to the New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), the route continued for another 0.07 miles (0.11 km) to the northwest of NY 303 until by 2017. NY 340 was assigned to part of its modern routing in the early 1930s and extended to its current length in the early 1940s.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New York State Route 304</span> State highway in Rockland County, New York, US

New York State Route 304 (NY 304), also known as "Rockland County Clerk Paul Piperato Memorial Highway", as well as Pearl Street for its first half a mile and Main Street for other parts, is a north–south state highway located in central Rockland County, New York, in the United States. The 10.38-mile (16.70 km) route begins at the New Jersey–New York border in Pearl River and ends at an intersection with U.S. Route 9W (US 9W) in the community of Congers. The route is a main route through Rockland County, intersecting NY 59 and indirectly connecting to the New York State Thruway and the Palisades Interstate Parkway (PIP) in Nanuet. NY 304 has three distinct sections: a freeway that extends from Pearl River to Nanuet, a surface section between Nanuet and New City, and an expressway linking New City to Haverstraw.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New York State Route 303</span> State highway in Rockland County, New York, US

New York State Route 303 (NY 303) is a north–south state highway in eastern Rockland County, New York, in the United States. It begins at the New Jersey state line in the hamlet of Tappan and runs generally northward for 10.92 miles (17.57 km) to an intersection with U.S. Route 9W (US 9W) in Clarkstown. The route has connections to the Palisades Interstate Parkway and the New York State Thruway, the latter carrying Interstate 87 (I-87) and I-287. NY 303 was assigned as part of the 1930 renumbering of state highways in New York, and only minor realignments have occurred since that time.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">New York State Route 45</span> State highway in Rockland County, New York, US

New York State Route 45 (NY 45) is a north–south state highway in central Rockland County, New York, in the United States. It spans 8.57 miles (13.79 km) from the village of Chestnut Ridge at the New Jersey–New York border, where it becomes County Route 73 (CR 73) in Bergen County, New Jersey, to U.S. Route 202 (US 202) in the town of Haverstraw. Though an interchange does exist between NY 45 and the Palisades Interstate Parkway, the route has no access to the New York State Thruway.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">U.S. Route 6 in New York</span> Section of U.S. Route in New York state

U.S. Route 6 (US 6) in New York is a 77.85-mile (125.29 km) stretch of United States Numbered Highway that spans from the Pennsylvania state line at Port Jervis to the Connecticut state line east of Brewster. Near both ends it runs in close proximity to Interstate 84 (I-84), which otherwise takes a more northerly route through Downstate New York. US 6, meanwhile, skirts the northern fringe of the New York metropolitan area.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">County Route 106 (Rockland County, New York)</span> Highway in Rockland County, New York

County Route 106 (CR 106) is a 7.8-mile (12.6 km) east–west county route in Rockland County, New York, in the United States. It serves as an eastward continuation of Kanawauke Road, extending from the Orange County line to U.S. Route 9W (US 9W) and US 202 in Stony Point via Harriman State Park. CR 106 intersects with several county highways in Rockland County along the way. The route was only one of two in Rockland County to keep its numbering from Orange County, with the other being CR 72. CR 106 had one spur route, CR 106A, which was recently decommissioned.

Seven Lakes Drive is a north–south parkway located in the Hudson Valley region of New York in the United States. It extends for just under 18 miles (29 km) on a northeast–southwest alignment from an intersection with New York State Route 17 (NY 17) in the village of Sloatsburg to a junction with U.S. Route 9W (US 9W) and US 202 south of the Bear Mountain Bridge in the town of Stony Point. Most of the parkway is located in either Harriman or Bear Mountain state parks, except for a small stretch near its western end. Ownership of Seven Lakes Drive is split between three entities, two of which are also responsible for maintenance of the road.

Arden Valley Road is a scenic road located in Southfields, New York, in the United States, that travels through Harriman State Park and is owned by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission. At 5.2 miles (8.4 km) long, it begins at New York State Route 17 (NY 17) in Southfields and ends at Seven Lakes Drive in Harriman State Park. Arden Valley Road also serves a trout stocking area for the Ramapo River. The road is located entirely in Orange County and is home to the Elk's Pen Trailhead in Harriman State Park. In 1921, plans arose by the commission to construct the road, which was completed the same year and stretched along the borderline with the Harriman estate. Major William A. Welch ordered 75 elk from Yellowstone National Park to be placed in a wired cage between Arden and Southfields in 1919. The elk eventually disappeared from the pen by 1942, and the area became the current Elk's Pen trailhead for trails within Harriman State Park.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">County Route 106 (Orange County, New York)</span>

County Route 106 (CR 106) in the county of Orange County, New York, was a continuation of two routes, New York State Route 17A (NY 17A) at its western terminus and Rockland CR 106 at the eastern terminus. Route 106 began at an intersection with NY 17A and its parent route, NY 17 in Southfields, where CR 106 signs are still posted according to the August 2018 Google Street View images. The route went eastward through Harriman State Park, crossing Seven Lakes Drive before entering nearby Rockland County, New York. There it became Rockland County Route 106 and heads all the way to Stony Point.

Sandyfield was a settlement of about 30 houses in the Town of Ramapo in Rockland County, New York, United States, that was submerged in 1928 when swampy Beaver Pond was dammed to create Lake Welch in Harriman State Park.

The Lake Welch Parkway, sometimes labeled Lake Welch Drive, is a limited-access parkway located within Harriman State Park in southern New York in the United States. It extends for 5.60 miles (9.01 km) on a southwest–northeast alignment from an intersection with Seven Lakes Drive to a partial interchange with the Palisades Interstate Parkway. The highway is located entirely in Rockland County, although it runs close to the border with Orange County. It is inventoried by the New York State Department of Transportation as New York State Route 987A, an unsigned reference route; however, it is owned by the Palisades Interstate Park Commission. The portion of the Lake Welch Parkway that lies south of Tiorati Brook Road is closed during the winter. The parkway is the main route to access all beaches in Harriman State Park: Lake Welch, Lake Tiorati, and Lake Sebago.

Lake Tiorati is one of the seven main lakes in Harriman State Park, located in Orange County, New York. It is a man-made lake, created by dredging swampland and constructing a concrete dam. The name Tiorati means "Blue like Sky". Its name is the Algonquin word for "sky-like".

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Google (March 31, 2011). "overview map of Tiorati Brook Road" (Map). Google Maps . Google. Retrieved March 31, 2011.
  2. "Directions to Tiorati". Tiorati Workshop. Retrieved March 31, 2011.
  3. 1 2 Myles, William J.; Chazin, Daniel (2010). Harriman Trails: A Guide and History. New York-New Jersey Trail Conference. pp. 354–355. ISBN   9781880775660.
  4. Thiells Quadrangle – New York (Map). 1:24,000. 7.5 Minute Series (Topographic). United States Geological Survey. 1955. Retrieved March 31, 2011.
Template:Attached KML/Tiorati Brook Road
KML is from Wikidata