Tip O'Neill (baseball)

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Tip O'Neill and family gravestone.jpg
O'Neill family gravestone
Tip O'Neill gravestone engraving.jpg
Close-up of Tip O'Neill's engraving

Shortly after O'Neill retired from baseball, The Sporting Life reported in July 1893 that he was "making book" at Sheepshead Bay, a horse racing track in New York City. [32] He also worked as a "big league umpire" and as a scout for various baseball clubs, including the Chicago White Sox. [3] [33] He moved to Montreal, Quebec where he lived with his brother and assisted in acquiring a minor league baseball club for the city. [1] [6]

On New Year's Eve 1915, O'Neill died suddenly at age 55 while riding on a Montreal streetcar. [3] The cause of death was an "attack of heart disease." [33] He was buried at St. Mary Cemetery in Woodstock, Ontario. [2]

In 1983, O'Neill was posthumously honoured as one of the first inductees of the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame. The Canadian Hall each year presents the Tip O'Neill Award in his honour to "the player judged to have excelled in individual achievement and team contribution while adhering to baseball's highest ideals." [1]

A municipal baseball field in Woodstock, Ontario is named Tip O'Neill Field in his honour. [34]

James "Tip" O'Neill was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 1997. [35]

Other "Tip" O'Neills

U.S. Speaker of the House "Tip" O'Neill was nicknamed after O'Neill. Tip O'Neill 1978 (retouched).jpg
U.S. Speaker of the House "Tip" O'Neill was nicknamed after O'Neill.

During the late 19th century and early 20th century, there were several other athletes who went by the name "Tip" O'Neill. In 1898, O'Neill wrote to The Sporting Life to correct a report that he was managing a baseball team in Montgomery, Alabama. He noted: "It seems strange that every ball player whose name happens to be O'Neill should call himself Tip. One Tip died in London, Can., a few years ago, and when I would meet friends that I had not met for some time they would take me for a ghost. The Chicago "Record" last spring had me dying of consumption." [36]

The confusion of "Tip" O'Neills continues as some sources erroneously state that O'Neill served as the president of the Western League, a minor league based in the Midwestern United States. [37] To the contrary, the individual who served as president of the Western League was Norris "Tip" O'Neill. [38]

Years later, the future American politician and Speaker of the House, Thomas "Tip" O'Neill (1912–1994), was given the nickname "Tip" as a boy, due to his shared surname with the 19th century baseball player. [39]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "James "Tip" O'Neill"". Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame & Museum. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 "Tip O'Neill Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com . Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 "Tip O'Neill Dies Suddenly". Richmond Times-Dispatch. January 2, 1916. p. 4.(available through the Library of Congress' Chronicling America database)
  4. "Tip O'Neill Minor League Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  5. "On the Fly" (PDF). The Sporting News. May 27, 1883. p. 4.
  6. 1 2 3 "Tip O'Neill Dies in Montreal: Member of Old-Time Browns, and Holder of Hitting Record". The Sporting News. January 6, 1916. p. 2.
  7. "St. Louis vs. Louisville at St. Louis September 3" (PDF). The Sporting Life. September 9, 1885. p. 3.
  8. 1 2 "1885 St. Louis Browns". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  9. "1886 St. Louis Browns". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  10. "Progressive Leaders & Records for Batting Average". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  11. "Single-Season Leaders & Records for Batting Average". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  12. "Progressive Leaders & Records for On-Base %". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  13. "Progressive Leaders & Records for Slugging %". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  14. "Progressive Leaders & Records for Hits". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  15. "Progressive Leaders & Records for Runs Scored". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  16. "Progressive Leaders & Records for Doubles". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  17. "Progressive Leaders & Records for Extra base hits". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  18. "Progressive Leaders & Records for Total Bases". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  19. "1887 Major League Baseball Batting Leaders". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  20. "1887 St. Louis Browns". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  21. "1888 St. Louis Browns". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  22. "1889 St. Louis Browns". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  23. "St. Louis Cardinals Team History & Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  24. "Charlie Comiskey Managerial Record". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  25. Ban Johnson (March 26, 1892). "Cincinnati Chips" (PDF). The Sporting Life. p. 16.
  26. "Editorial News, Views, Comment" (PDF). The Sporting Life. May 14, 1892. p. 2.
  27. "Editorial News, Views, Comment" (PDF). The Sporting Life. June 18, 1892. p. 2.
  28. "Editorial News, Views, Comment" (PDF). The Sporting Life. July 16, 1892. p. 2.
  29. Ban Johnson (January 7, 1893). "Cincinnati Chips" (PDF). The Sporting Life. p. 3.
  30. "Career Leaders & Records for Batting Average". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  31. Shoeless Joe Jackson also had a higher career batting average but is on the ineligible list due to his role in the Black Sox scandal.
  32. "Editorial Views, News Comment" (PDF). The Sporting Life. July 1, 1893. p. 2.
  33. 1 2 "Original "Tip" O'Neill Dies of Heart Disease". The Washington Times. January 1, 1916. p. 10.(available through the LOC Chronicling America database)
  34. Greg Colgan (May 9, 2013). "With money from a government grant and the City of Woodstock, Tip O'Neill Park was revamped". Woodstock Sentinel-Review.
  35. "Tip O'Neill". oshof.ca . Archived from the original on 29 December 2014. Retrieved 24 September 2014.
  36. "The Only Tip O'Neill: Objects to Lightweights Appropriating His Famous Title" (PDF). The Sporting News. January 29, 1898. p. 3.
  37. "James "Tip" O'Neill". Ontario Sports Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on August 8, 2014. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  38. "Norris O'Neill". SABR Baseball Biography Project. Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved July 31, 2014.
  39. Hodgson, G. (1994, January 7). Obituary: Thomas P. O'Neill. The Independent (London), pp. 14.
Tip O'Neill
Tip O'Neill (baseball player).jpg
Left fielder
Born:(1860-05-15)May 15, 1860
Springfield, Canada West
Died: December 31, 1915(1915-12-31) (aged 55)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Batted: Right
Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 5, 1883, for the New York Gothams
Last MLB appearance
August 30, 1892, for the Cincinnati Reds
Achievements
Preceded by Single season doubles record holder
1887–1899
Succeeded by
Preceded by American Association Home Run Champion
1887
Succeeded by
Preceded by Hitting for the cycle
April 30, 1887
May 7, 1887
Succeeded by