Tipsoo Lake

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Tipsoo Lake
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Tipsoo Lake
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Tipsoo Lake
Location Pierce County, Washington
Coordinates 46°52′09″N121°31′02″W / 46.8691°N 121.5173°W / 46.8691; -121.5173 Coordinates: 46°52′09″N121°31′02″W / 46.8691°N 121.5173°W / 46.8691; -121.5173
Type alpine lake
Surface elevation5,298 feet (1,615 m)

Tipsoo Lake, at an elevation of 5,298 feet (1,615 m) above sea level, [1] is an alpine lake within the Northern Cascade Range near the summit of Chinook Pass in Pierce County, Washington. [2]

The area is popular with photographers as the shores and surrounding area abound with the vibrant yellow, orange and purple colors of huckleberry, lupine, Indian paintbrush, and Partridgefoot. There are several hiking trails near the lake that vary in degrees of difficulty and that have views of Mount Rainier, Yakima Peak, and the surrounding landscape. [3]

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Chinook Peak is a 6,904 feet (2,104 m) summit located on the eastern border of Mount Rainier National Park. It is also on the shared border of Pierce County and Yakima County in Washington state. Chinook Peak is situated north of Chinook Pass on the crest of the Cascade Range. Its nearest higher peak is Crystal Mountain, 1.31 mi (2.11 km) to the north. Crystal Peak lies 0.75 mi (1.21 km) to the northwest, and Cupalo Rock is 1.0 mi (1.6 km) to the east-northeast. Precipitation runoff from Chinook Peak drains into tributaries of the White River and Yakima River.

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Yakima Peak is a 6,226-ft summit located on the eastern border of Mount Rainier National Park. It is also on the shared border of Pierce County and Yakima County in Washington state. Yakima Peak is situated northwest of Tipsoo Lake and west of Chinook Pass on the crest of the Cascade Range. Its nearest higher neighbor is Deadwood Peak, 0.59 mi (0.95 km) to the north. The name Yakima Peak honors the Yakima Tribe of eastern Washington state. From Chinook Pass, a short scramble up a gully on the north side leads to a flat summit with unobstructed views of Mount Rainier and Naches Peak.

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Deadwood Peak is a 6,280-foot-elevation mountain summit located on the eastern border of Mount Rainier National Park. It is also situated on the shared border of Pierce County and Yakima County in Washington state. Deadwood Peak is set on the crest of the Cascade Range, immediately north of Yakima Peak and Chinook Pass, with the Pacific Crest Trail traversing its east slope. Its nearest higher peak is Naches Peak, 0.59 mi (0.95 km) to the southeast. Deadwood Peak takes its name from Deadwood Lakes and Deadwood Creek to its northwest, and their names came from the large number of downed trees in the area. From Chinook Pass, a short scramble up the south side leads to the summit with unobstructed views of Mount Rainier.

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Double Peak is the descriptive name of a 6,199 feet (1,889 m) double summit located in Mount Rainier National Park in Pierce County of Washington state. Part of the Cascade Range, it is situated northwest of Shriner Peak, south of Governors Ridge, and southeast of the Cowlitz Chimneys.

References

  1. U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Tipsoo Lake
  2. "Tipsoo Lake Fishing in Pierce County, Washington". FishingWorks.com. Archived from the original on 2012-02-29. Retrieved 2010-06-12.
  3. "Tipsoo Lake. Washington State Tourism". ExperienceWA.com. Archived from the original on 2009-07-29. Retrieved 2010-06-12.