Tir (demon)

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In Islamic demonology, Thabr (ثبر) is one of the five sons of Iblis mentioned by Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj. [1] He is a devil who causes calamities and injuries. [2] His four brothers are named: Awar (اعور or لأعوار), Zalambur (زلنبور), Sut (مسوط), and Dasim (داسم). Each of them is linked to another psychological function, which they try to encourage to prevent humans spiritual development. [3]

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References

  1. Peter J. Awn Satan's Tragedy and Redemption: Iblis in Sufi Psychology BRILL 1983 ISBN   9789004069060 p. 58
  2. Patrick Hughes, Thomas Patrick Hughes Dictionary of Islam Asian Educational Services 1995 ISBN   978-8-120-60672-2 page 135
  3. Peter J. Awn Satan's Tragedy and Redemption: Iblis in Sufi Psychology BRILL 1983 ISBN   9789004069060 p.58