Tirau

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Tirau
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Tirau
Location of Tirau in New Zealand
Coordinates: 37°59′S175°45′E / 37.983°S 175.750°E / -37.983; 175.750 Coordinates: 37°59′S175°45′E / 37.983°S 175.750°E / -37.983; 175.750
CountryFlag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand
Region Waikato
Territorial authority South Waikato District
Ward Tirau
Population
 (2013 census)
   Urban
690
Time zone UTC+12 (NZST)
  Summer (DST) UTC+13 (NZDT)
Postcode
3410
Area code(s) 07

Tirau (Māori : Tīrau) is a small town in the Waikato region of the North Island of New Zealand, 50 kilometres southeast of Hamilton. The town has a population of 690 (2013 census). [1] In the Māori language, "Tīrau" means "place of many cabbage trees."

Māori language Polynesian language spoken by New Zealand Māori

Māori, also known as te reo, is an Eastern Polynesian language spoken by the Māori people, the indigenous population of New Zealand. Closely related to Cook Islands Māori, Tuamotuan, and Tahitian, it gained recognition as one of New Zealand's official languages in 1987. The number of speakers of the language has declined sharply since 1945, but a Māori language revitalisation effort slowed the decline, and the language has experienced a revival, particularly since about 2015.

Waikato region in New Zealands North Island

Waikato is a local government region of the upper North Island of New Zealand. It covers the Waikato District, Hauraki, Coromandel Peninsula, the northern King Country, much of the Taupo District, and parts of Rotorua District. It is governed by the Waikato Regional Council.

North Island The northern of the two main islands of New Zealand

The North Island, also officially named Te Ika-a-Māui, is one of the two main islands of New Zealand, separated from the larger but much less populous South Island by Cook Strait. The island's area is 113,729 square kilometres (43,911 sq mi), making it the world's 14th-largest island. It has a population of 3,749,200.

Contents

Tirau is a major junction in the New Zealand state-highway network. Just south of the township is the intersection of State Highway 1 and State Highway 5, where traffic from Auckland and Hamilton on State Highway 1 split to go either to Rotorua on SH 5, or continue along SH 1 to Taupo and beyond to Napier, Palmerston North and Wellington. State Highway 27 splits off State Highway 1 in the north of the town, providing a route north to the Coromandel Peninsula and an alternative route to Auckland, bypassing Hamilton.

New Zealand State Highway 1 road in New Zealand

State Highway 1 is the longest and most significant road in the New Zealand road network, running the length of both main islands. It appears on road maps as SH 1 and on road signs as a white number 1 on a red shield, but it has the official designations SH 1N in the North Island, SH 1S in the South Island.

New Zealand State Highway 5 road in New Zealand

State Highway 5 is the second shortest of New Zealand's eight national highways. It extends from SH 1 at Tirau, on the plains of the Waikato River, to SH 2, close to the Hawke Bay coast at Bay View, 10 km north of Napier. Distances are measured from north to south.

Auckland Metropolitan area in North Island, New Zealand

Auckland is a city in the North Island of New Zealand. The most populous urban area in the country, Auckland has an urban population of around 1,628,900. It is located in the Auckland Region—the area governed by Auckland Council—which includes outlying rural areas and the islands of the Hauraki Gulf, resulting in a total population of 1,695,900. Auckland is a diverse, multicultural and cosmopolitan city, home to the largest Polynesian population in the world. A Māori-language name for Auckland is Tāmaki or Tāmaki Makaurau, meaning "Tāmaki with a hundred lovers", in reference to the desirability of its fertile land at the hub of waterways in all directions.

Tirau is primarily a farming town but in recent years has begun to exploit the income that comes from being at a major road junction.

The small community of Okoroire (with hot springs) is located just north of Tirau. [2]

Okoroire railway station was over 4 km (2.5 mi) to the west of the hot springs, on the Kinleith Branch, opened on 8 March 1886 and closed to passengers on 31 July 1962 and to goods on 18 August 1968. [3] [4] The railway line remains open for freight. [5]

Kinleith Branch

The Kinleith Branch railway line is located in the Waikato region of New Zealand. The line was constructed by the Thames Valley and Rotorua Railway Company, Taupo Totara Timber Company and rebuilt by the Public Works Department primarily to serve the Kinleith Mill in 1952. It is 65 kilometres (40 mi) in length.

History and culture

European settlement

In the 19th century, Tirau, then Oxford, was originally planned as a large-scale city for the Waikato, [6] however plans were changed after the entrepreneurial Rose family bought up large areas of land in the region, with the intention of making large returns when it came of high demand. Oxford later became a rural service town, and changed its name to Tirau in 1896.[ citation needed ]

Railway station

Oxford railway station opened on 8 March 1886, [7] 133 mi 60 ch (215.2 km) from Auckland [8] and 30 mi 60 ch (49.5 km) from Morrinsville, where the Kinleith Branch is crossed by Okoroire Rd [9] The line was extended 6 mi 77 ch (11.2 km) south to Putaruru [10] and Lichfield on 21 June 1886. [11] 563 passengers bought tickets in 1894, [12] 330 in 1895 [13] and 308 in 1896, when the main import was coal and the main exports timber and sheep. [14] It was renamed Tirau on 8 March 1886 and closed to passengers on 12 November 1968 and to goods on 29 March 1981. [15] The station had a small platform building, a goods shed and a water tower. [16]

Recent history

In 1991, local business man Henry Clothier took advantage of the town's relatively cheap real estate and high traffic volume by opening an Antique shop in the former Rose Bros. grocery store building. Many other businesses followed suit off the back of his success throughout the 1990s until today. Tirau has built a reputation as a shopping destination for antiques, collectibles and other niche items.

In 2005/06 the South Waikato District Council is working, on behalf of the Tirau Ward, in conjunction with the community, to develop a concept plan for Tirau's future. [17] This project is taking the success of Tirau's transformation over the past decade and linking it with the requirements of the Local Government Act 2002 [18] new emphasis on the four well-beings, social, economic, environmental and cultural.

Marae

The local Paparāmu Marae and Te Apunga meeting house are affiliated with the Ngāti Raukawa hapū of Ngāti Mōtai and Ngāti Te Apunga. [19] [20]

Tourism

The Tirau 'good shepherd', outside the local church The Tirau 'good shepherd'.jpg
The Tirau 'good shepherd', outside the local church

The town is now a well known tourist stop-off, and is characterised by many art works created out of corrugated iron. The church and many of the shops feature corrugated iron sculptures by local artist Steven Clothier and two large buildings are completely made from this material; the information centre which is shaped like a giant dog, [21] and the neighbouring sheep and ram building [22] - earning Tirau the title of "Corrugated Capital of the World".

The Castle, a large toy museum on the town's southern limits which opened in 2000, can clearly be seen when heading towards the township from Rotorua or Taupo. The Tirau dairy factory is New Zealand's only producer of lactalbumin, a key ingredient in the production of sports supplements. [23]

The Tirau pub The Tirau pub.jpg
The Tirau pub
Tirau's corrugated iron 'giant dog' and 'big sheep' buildings. The dog and sheep buildings, Tirau, Waikato, New Zealand, 3 April 2008.jpg
Tirau's corrugated iron 'giant dog' and 'big sheep' buildings.

Government

Tirau is governed locally by the South Waikato District Council. Nationally, Tirau is part of the Taupō general electorate and the Te Tai Hauāuru Māori electorate. [24]

Education

Tirau Primary School is the sole school in Tirau. It is a contributing primary school (Years 1–6) and has 102 students as of March 2019. [25]

The nearest secondary school is Putaruru College, 8 kilometres (5 mi) south of Tirau, in Putaruru.

See also

Notes

    Related Research Articles

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    References

    1. "2013 Census QuickStats about a place: Tirau". Statistics New Zealand. Retrieved 17 December 2014.
    2. "1:50,000 map". topomap.co.nz. Topo Map. Retrieved 17 November 2018.
    3. "Current and historical topographic maps (topomaps) of New Zealand". www.mapspast.org.nz. 1944. Retrieved 13 May 2018.
    4. "Photo of 1932 Hamilton mystery excursion train at station". NZ ETC. Victoria University of Wellington . Retrieved 17 November 2018.
    5. Scoble, Juliet (2010). "Names & Opening & Closing Dates of Railway Stations" (PDF). Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand.
    6. "1881 Plan of the township of Oxford". www.aucklandcity.govt.nz. Retrieved 13 May 2018.
    7. "The New Railway Time-Table". Waikato Times. 6 March 1886. p. 2. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
    8. "Railway Extension". New Zealand Herald. 23 February 1886. p. 5. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
    9. "Current and historical topographic maps (topomaps) of New Zealand". www.mapspast.org.nz. 1944. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
    10. "Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives — 1894 Session I — D-01 Page 45". atojs.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
    11. "Opening of Railway Line to Lichfield". New Zealand Herald. 15 June 1886. p. 4. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
    12. "Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives — 1894 Session I — D-02 Page 17". atojs.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
    13. "Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives — 1895 Session I — D-02 Page 25". atojs.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
    14. "Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives — 1896 Session I — D-02 Page 11". atojs.natlib.govt.nz. Retrieved 14 May 2018.
    15. Scoble, Juliet (2010). "Names & Opening & Closing Dates of Railway Stations" (PDF). Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand.
    16. "Tirau, South Waikato District". natlib.govt.nz. 1 January 1965. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
    17. South Waikato District Council
    18. Local Government Act 2002
    19. "Te Kāhui Māngai directory". tkm.govt.nz. Te Puni Kōkiri.
    20. "Māori Maps". maorimaps.com. Te Potiki National Trust.
    21. "The i-SITE Visitor Centre" . Retrieved 26 April 2019.
    22. Wilkie, Kelsie (20 October 2016). "Corrugated iron sheep and ram buildings in Tirau for sale". Stuff.
    23. "Tirau". Fonterra. Retrieved 27 March 2013.
    24. "Find my electorate". Electoral Commission. Retrieved 19 December 2015.
    25. "Directory of Schools - as at 3 April 2019". New Zealand Ministry of Education. Retrieved 9 May 2018.