Tired Theodore (1957 film)

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Tired Theodore
Tired Theodore (1957 film).jpg
Directed by Géza von Cziffra
Written by
Starring
Cinematography Willy Winterstein
Edited by Martha Dübber
Music by Heino Gaze
Production
company
Distributed byDeutsche Film Hansa
Release date
6 June 1957
Running time
95 minutes
Country West Germany
LanguageGerman

Tired Theodore (German: Der müde Theodor) is a 1957 West German comedy film directed by Géza von Cziffra and starring Heinz Erhardt, Renate Ewert and Peter Weck. [1] It was shot at the Göttingen Studios. The film's sets were designed by the art directors Dieter Bartels and Paul Markwitz.

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References

  1. Bock & Bergfelder p.113

Bibliography