Tisdale–Jones House

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Tisdale–Jones House
Tisdale-Jones House.JPG
Tisdale–Jones House, September 2012
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Location520 New St., New Bern, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°6′36″N77°2′33″W / 35.11000°N 77.04250°W / 35.11000; -77.04250 Coordinates: 35°6′36″N77°2′33″W / 35.11000°N 77.04250°W / 35.11000; -77.04250
Area0.3 acres (0.12 ha)
Builtc. 1769 (1769)
NRHP reference No. 72000954 [1]
Added to NRHPApril 25, 1972

Tisdale–Jones House, also known as the New Bern City Schools Administration Building, is a historic home located at New Bern, Craven County, North Carolina. It was built about 1769, and is a 2+12-story, central hall plan frame dwelling with a large two-story rear ell. In 1958, the New Bern City Board of Education began using the building as offices; in the 1980s it was returned to private residential use. [2]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. Survey Planning Unit Staff (December 1971). "Tisdale–Jones House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places – Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2014-08-01.