Tisentnops

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Tisentnops
Scientific classification Red Pencil Icon.png
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Chelicerata
Class: Arachnida
Order: Araneae
Infraorder: Araneomorphae
Family: Caponiidae
Genus: Tisentnops
Platnick, 1994 [1]
Type species
T. leopoldi
(Zapfe, 1962)
Species

Tisentnops is a genus of South American araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, first described by Norman I. Platnick in 1994. [2] As of April 2019 it contains only three species. [1]

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Norman I. Platnick American arachnologist (1951–2020)

Norman Ira Platnick was an American biological systematist and arachnologist. At the time of his death, he was a professor emeritus of the Richard Gilder Graduate School and Peter J. Solomon Family Curator Emeritus of the invertebrate zoology department of the American Museum of Natural History. A 1973 Ph.D. recipient at Harvard University, Platnick described over 1,800 species of spiders from around the world, making him the second most prolific spider taxonomist in history, behind only Eugène Simon. Until 2014 he was also the maintainer of the World Spider Catalog, a website formerly hosted by the AMNH which tracks the arachnology literature, and attempts to maintain a comprehensive list, sorted taxonomically, of every species of spider which has been formally described. In 2007 he received the International Society of Arachnology's Bonnet award, named for Pierre Bonnet, in recognition of his work on the catalog.

Cithaeronidae Family of spiders

Cithaeronidae is a small family of araneomorph spiders first described by Simon in 1893 Female Cithaeron are about 5 to 7 millimetres long, males about 4 millimetres (0.16 in).

Gallieniellidae Family of spiders

Gallieniellidae is a family of spiders first described by J. Millot in 1947. It was originally thought to be endemic to Madagascar until species were also found in southern Kenya, northeastern Argentina, and Australia. Drassodella was transferred from the family Gnaphosidae in 1990. They are suspected to be specialized in ant-preying.

Trochanteriidae Family of spiders

Trochanteriidae is a family of spiders first described by Ferdinand Karsch in 1879 containing about 180 species in 21 genera. Most are endemic to Australia though Doliomalus and Trochanteria are from South America and Olin and Plator are from Asia. Platyoides species exist in southern and eastern Africa, Madagascar, and the Canary Islands with one species, P. walteri, introduced to Australia.

Orsolobidae Family of spiders

Orsolobidae is a six-eyed spider family with about 180 described species in thirty genera. It was first described by J. A. L. Cooke in 1965, and was raised to family status from "Dysderidae" in 1985.

Notnops is a monotypic genus of South American araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, containing the single species, Notnops calderoni. It was first described by Norman I. Platnick in 1994, and has only been found in Chile. They have an orange carapace with yellow legs. Males have a body length of about 2 millimetres (0.079 in) long, and females are slightly larger, with a body length up to 3 millimetres (0.12 in).

Calponia is a monotypic genus of araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, containing the single species, Calponia harrisonfordi. It was first described in 1993 by Norman I. Platnick, who named the type species after the film actor Harrison Ford to thank him for narrating a documentary for the Natural History Museum in London. It has only been found in California in the United States.

Caponiidae Family of spiders

Caponiidae is a family of ecribellate haplogyne spiders that are unusual in a number of ways. They differ from other spiders in lacking book lungs and having the posterior median spinnerets anteriorly displaced to form a transverse row with the anterior lateral spinnerets. Most species have only two eyes, which is also unusual among spiders. A few species of Caponiidae variously have four, six or eight eyes. In some species the number of eyes will increase when the spiderling changes its skin as it grows towards adulthood.

<i>Cubanops</i> Genus of spiders

Cubanops is a genus of Caribbean araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae first described by A. Sánchez-Ruiz, Norman I. Platnick & N. Dupérré in 2010. These spiders are wandering hunters, generally found at ground level, under stones, in leaf litter or in the soil, and have only been found in the West Indies.

<i>Nops</i> (spider) Genus of spiders

Nops is a genus of medium-sized South American, Central American, and Caribbean spiders in the family Caponiidae, first described by Alexander Macleay in 1839. It has a great richness on the Caribbean islands, and most mainland species are located in high proportion toward the Caribbean coast. It likely has a neotropical distribution, though most species of South America are known only from the coast of Colombia and Venezuela, including the islands of Aruba, Curaçao, Bonaire and Trinidad.

Pseudanapis is a genus of araneomorph spiders in the family Anapidae, first described by Eugène Simon in 1905. It is a senior synonym of "Gossiblemma" and "Amrishoonops".

Caponina is a genus of araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, first described by Eugène Simon in 1892.

Iraponia is a monotypic genus of Asian araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, containing the single species, Iraponia scutata. It was first described by Y. Kranz-Baltensperger, Norman I. Platnick & N. Dupérré in 2009, and has only been found in Iran.

<i>Laoponia</i> Genus of spiders

Laoponia is a genus of Southeast Asian araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, first described by Norman I. Platnick & Peter Jäger in 2008. As of April 2019 it contains only two species.

Nopsides is a monotypic genus of North American araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, containing the single species, Nopsides ceralbonus. It is one of three nopine species, in addition to Tarsonops and Orthonops, described by Ralph Vary Chamberlin from specimens collected from the Baja California region and nearby islands in 1924. They are active during the night, hiding under large stones of Mexico's deserts and xeric shrublands during the day.

Nyetnops is a genus of South American araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, first described by Norman I. Platnick & A. A. Lise in 2007. As of April 2019 it contains only two species.

Taintnops is a genus of South American araneomorph spiders in the family Caponiidae, first described by Norman I. Platnick in 1994. As of April 2019 it contains only two species, both found in Chile.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Physoglenidae</span> Family of spiders

Physoglenidae is a family of araneomorph spiders first described by Alexander Petrunkevitch in 1928 as a subfamily of Pholcidae. It was later moved to Synotaxidae until a study in 2016 showed that they formed a distinct clade.

Nopsma is a genus of tropical spiders in the family Caponiidae. It was first described by A. Sánchez-Ruiz, Antônio Domingos Brescovit and A. B. Bonaldo in 2020. It was originally described under the name "Nyetnops juchuy" in 2014. They are found in Central and South America.

References

  1. 1 2 Gloor, Daniel; Nentwig, Wolfgang; Blick, Theo; Kropf, Christian (2019). "Gen. Tisentnops Platnick, 1994". World Spider Catalog Version 20.0. Natural History Museum Bern. doi:10.24436/2 . Retrieved 2019-05-18.
  2. Platnick, N. I. (1994). "A review of the Chilean spiders of the family Caponiidae (Araneae, Haplogynae)". American Museum Novitates (3113): 1–10.