Tit-like dacnis

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Tit-like dacnis
Scientific classification OOjs UI icon edit-ltr.svg
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Family: Thraupidae
Genus: Xenodacnis
Species:
X. parina
Binomial name
Xenodacnis parina
Cabanis, 1873
Xenodacnis parina map.svg

The tit-like dacnis (Xenodacnis parina) is a small neotropical passerine bird found in southern Ecuador and Peru. In Spanish, it is known as Azulito Altoandino. It is found in Andean montane scrub forests from 3000 m to 4600 m elevation.

Contents

Adults reach 12.5 cm in length. Males are solid deep blue with dark eyes, bill, and feet. Females of all subspecies are duller, with rufous-brown underparts.

Taxonomy

The tit-like dacnis was formally described in 1873 by the German ornithologist Jean Cabanis from a specimen collected in the Andes of central Peru. Cabanis introduced the genus Xenodacnis and coined the binomial name Xenodacnis parina. [2] [3] The genus name combines the Ancient Greek xenos meaning "different" or "unusual" with the genus name Dacnis . The specific epithet parina is from Modern Latin and means "tit like". [4] The tit-like dacnis is sister to a clade containing the four species now placed in the genus Idiopsar . [5] [6]

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References

  1. BirdLife International (2017). "Xenodacnis parina". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species . 2017: e.T103839796A119559816. doi: 10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-3.RLTS.T103839796A119559816.en . Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  2. Cabanis, Jean (1873). "Xenodacnis parina n. sp". Journal für Ornithologie (in German). 21: 312, Plate 4 figs. 1, 2.
  3. Paynter, Raymond A. Jr, ed. (1970). Check-List of Birds of the World. Vol. 13. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Museum of Comparative Zoology. p. 397.
  4. Jobling, James A. (2010). The Helm Dictionary of Scientific Bird Names. London: Christopher Helm. pp. 292, 410. ISBN   978-1-4081-2501-4.
  5. Burns, K.J.; Shultz, A.J.; Title, P.O.; Mason, N.A.; Barker, F.K.; Klicka, J.; Lanyon, S.M.; Lovette, I.J. (2014). "Phylogenetics and diversification of tanagers (Passeriformes: Thraupidae), the largest radiation of Neotropical songbirds". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 75: 41–77. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2014.02.006. PMID   24583021.
  6. Gill, Frank; Donsker, David; Rasmussen, Pamela, eds. (July 2020). "Tanagers and allies". IOC World Bird List Version 10.2. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 5 November 2020.

Clements, James F., and Noam Shany. A Field Guide to the Birds of Peru. Ibis Publishing, 2001.