Titia Bergsma

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Jan Cock Blomhoff and his red-haired wife Titia Bergsma (seated), their infant son Jantje, the wetnurse Petronella Muns(standing), the Indonesian maid Marathy, and a Javanese servant boy (behind sofa). Japanese print drawn by Kawahara Keiga, circa 1817. BlomhoffJapan.jpg
Jan Cock Blomhoff and his red-haired wife Titia Bergsma (seated), their infant son Jantje, the wetnurse Petronella Muns(standing), the Indonesian maid Marathy, and a Javanese servant boy (behind sofa). Japanese print drawn by Kawahara Keiga, circa 1817.

Titia Bergsma (Leeuwarden, 13 February 1786 – The Hague, 2 April 1821) was a Dutch woman who visited Dejima Island, Japan, in August 1817 with her husband, Jan Cock Blomhoff.

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Under the Tokugawa shogunate's sakoku policy Japan was extremely secluded. The Dutch and Chinese were allowed to visit the country, but only for trade, and no women were permitted. The governor of Nagasaki allowed Bergsma to enter the island. Five weeks later when the shōgun Tokugawa Ienari became aware of her presence, he ordered that Titia and the wetnurse Petronella Muns had to leave. In December the women went back to Batavia and Holland and Bergsma never saw her husband again.

Scroll painting with Titia Cock Blomhoff, the servant Marateij, the son Johannes Blomhoff and the nurse Petronella Muns Rolschildering- Titia Cock Blomhoff, de bediende Marateij, het zoontje Johannes Blomhoff en de min Petronella Munts- Stichting Nationaal Museum van Wereldculturen - RV-5824-17.jpg
Scroll painting with Titia Cock Blomhoff, the servant Marateij, the son Johannes Blomhoff and the nurse Petronella Muns

In the meanwhile, Japanese painters and sculptors had made 500 images of Bergsma. Her images had such popularity in Japan that they outsold all other prints in 19th century Japan. Images can be found all over Japan. There are companies which specialise entirely in Bergsma images. It is said[ by whom? ] her face can be seen on four million pieces of Japanese porcelain.

The life of Bergsma has been adapted to animation in Japan.[ citation needed ]

See also

Japanese print featuring Jan Cock Blomhoff, Titia Bergsma, their small son Johannes and nurse Petronella Munts. Blomhoff, Titia and Johannes - KONB11-BLOMHOFF-TITIA-NEHA.jpg
Japanese print featuring Jan Cock Blomhoff, Titia Bergsma, their small son Johannes and nurse Petronella Munts.

Nagasaki-e genre of art about foreign women during Tokugawa era

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Titia Bergsma at Wikimedia Commons

Titia Bergsma and family depicted on a Japanese vase Vase with picture Titia Bergsma.jpg
Titia Bergsma and family depicted on a Japanese vase

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