Title of Attorney (Argentina)

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The Title of Attorney (Título de Abogado), prefix: Abog. is an undergraduate degree given to law students in Argentina. After 5 to 6 years of studying law, it grants the applicant with a professional degree that allows them to practice their profession as a lawyer anywhere in the jurisdiction of Argentina.

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