Tiu (pharaoh)

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Tiu, also known as Teyew, was an ancient Egyptian Pharaoh who ruled the Nile Delta. [2]

Tiu is mentioned in the Palermo Stone inscriptions, along with a small number of kings of Lower Egypt. [3] As there is no other evidence of such a ruler, he may be a mythical king preserved through oral tradition, [4] or may even be completely fictitious. [5] [6]

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References

  1. From: Palermo Stone
  2. J. H. Breasted, History of Egypt from the Earliest Time to the Persian Conquest, 1909, p.36
  3. J. H. Breasted, Ancient Records of Egypt, Part One, Chicago 1906, §90
  4. Helck, Untersuchungen zu Manetho und den ägyptischen Königslisten 1956, Berlin: Akademie-Verlag. Untersuchungen zur Geschichte und Altertumskunde Ägyptens 18
  5. O'Mara, Was there an Old Kingdom historiography? Is it datable? 1996, Orientalia 65: 197-208
  6. Wilkinson, Toby A. H. (2000). Royal Annals of Ancient Egypt. p.85 New York: Columbia University Press). ISBN   0-7103-0667-9.