Tjungkara Ken

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Tjungkara Ken
Born (1969-10-01) 1 October 1969 (age 53)
Nationality Australian
OccupationPainter
Years active2008 – present
OrganizationTjala Arts
Style Western Desert art
Parent(s) Mick Wikilyiri (father)
Paniny Mick (mother)

Tjungkara Ken (born 1 October 1969) is a Pitjantjatjara artist from Amata, South Australia, [1] in the APY lands. She began painting in 1997, [1] when Minymaku Arts was opened by the women of Amaṯa. [2] She started painting professionally in 2008. [1] By that time, the artists' co-operative had been renamed Tjala Arts. [2]

Contents

Themes

Ken's paintings depict stories and figures from her personal Tjukurpa (Dreaming), the spirituality that is associated with her ancestor's homeland. Her father is from the country around Amaṯa and Walitjara, and Ken most often depicts this country and its Tjukurpa in her paintings. She also illustrates her mother's country, which is further west, near Irrunytju in Western Australia. [1]

Exhibitions and awards

Ken's paintings have been featured in group exhibitions in many of Australia's major cities. Some of her work was also part of an exhibition in Graz, Austria in 2002. [1] [3] One of her paintings, titled Ngayuku ngura – My Country, was chosen as a finalist for the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award in 2010. [3] [4] It was bought by a private collector. [5]

A painting depicting the Kungkarungkara (Seven Sisters Dreaming), was chosen by the Art Gallery of South Australia as the prize for a competition run during the Gallery's Desert Country exhibition in 2011. [6] Ken's painting from the Art Gallery of South Australia's permanent collection was also included in the exhibition and featured on the cover of the Desert Country catalogue. The exhibition featured works by several artists from across the Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands, including Maringka Baker, Nura Rupert and Jimmy Baker. [7] [8]

Examples of Ken's work are shown in the National Gallery of Victoria, [9] the Art Gallery of South Australia, [10] the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art, [3] [11] and the National Gallery of Australia. [12] It is also held in several major private galleries in Australia. [1] [3]

She was an Archibald Prize finalist in 2017, with her Kungkarangkalpa tjukurpa (Seven Sisters dreaming), a self-portrait. [13] She was awarded the Roberts Family Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Prize for Seven Sisters, her entry in the 2021 Wynne Prize. [14]

There are many other artists in Ken's extended family, working out of Tjala Arts. When working with her four sisters—Yaritji Young, Freda Brady, Sandra Ken and Maringka Tunkin—the group is known as the Ken Sisters. [15]

Related Research Articles

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Jimmy Donegan is an Aboriginal Australian artist. His painting Papa Tjukurpa munu Pukara won the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award in 2010. He speaks Pitjantjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra. His work is held in several major private galleries in Australia and Europe; the only major public gallery to hold one of his works is the National Gallery of Victoria.

Dickie Minyintiri was an Australian Aboriginal artist from Pukatja, South Australia. He began painting in 2005, when he was about 90 years old. He is now one of central Australia's most successful artists, after winning the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award in 2011. He was said to be the oldest artist at Pukatja, and also the community's most senior lawman.

Hector Tjupuru Burton was an Australian Aboriginal artist. He is a leading artist from Amaṯa, in north-western South Australia. His work has been shown in exhibitions since 2003, in several cities in Australia and other countries. His first solo exhibition was held in 2004 in Melbourne. Examples of his paintings are held in the National Gallery of Victoria, the Art Gallery of South Australia, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, and Flinders University.

Wingu Tingima was an Aboriginal artist from central Australia. She was born in Great Victoria Desert, and grew up living a traditional way of life in the bush, without any contact with Western civilization. A member of the Pitjantjatjara people, she painted spiritual stories from her Dreaming. Along with her friend and colleague Eileen Yaritja Stevens, Wingu became one of the most well-known artists to paint in the style of the Western Desert.

Ginger Nobby Wikilyiri is an Australian Aboriginal artist from Nyapaṟi, South Australia.

Maringka Baker is an Aboriginal artist from central Australia. She lives in the Pitjantjatjara community of Kaṉpi, South Australia, and paints for Tjungu Palya, based in nearby Nyapaṟi.Maringka is known for her paintings. Maringka paints sacred stories from her family's Dreaming (spirituality). As well as the important cultural meanings they carry, her paintings are known for being rich in colour and contrast. She often paints the desert landscape in bright green colours, and contrasts it against reds and ochres to depict landforms. She also uses layers of contrasting colours to show the detail of the desert in full bloom.

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Tiger Palpatja was an Australian Aboriginal artist from the Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands.

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Harry Tjutjuna is an Aboriginal artist from central Australia. He belongs to the Pitjantjatjara people. Tjutjuna began painting in 2005. He held his first solo exhibition in 2007, in Darwin. His work is now held in several major public galleries in Australia, including the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the National Gallery of Victoria, and the National Gallery of Australia. His painting Ninuku Tjukurpa was a finalist for the Togard Contemporary Art Award in 2009. In 2010 and 2011, another of Tjutjuna's paintings, Wati Nyiru munu Wati Wanka, was chosen as a finalist in both the Western Australian Indigenous Art Awards, and the National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award (NATSIAA).

Maringka Tunkin is a Pitjantjatjara artist from Central Australia.

Barbara Mbitjana Moore is an Anmatyerre woman who grew up in Ti-Tree in the Northern Territory, moving later to Amata in South Australia's Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands. In April 2003, Moore began painting at Amata's Tjala Arts, and, since then, has received widespread recognition. Moore won a National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award in 2012 and has been a finalist in many other years. Moore has also been a finalist for the Wynne Prize.

Yaritji Young is a Pitjantjatjara woman from Pukatja, a community within the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands and she now lives at Rocket Bore; a homeland north of Amata. Young is a significant Australian Aboriginal artist and senior law women who is to committed to fostering law and culture and this forms a core part of her artistic practice. Most of Young's paintings are drawn from the Tjala Dreaming.

Tjala Arts, formerly known as Minymaku Arts, is an Aboriginal Australian-owned and -managed arts centre located in the remote community of Amata in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands in the remote north-west of South Australia.

Sylvia Kanytjupai Ken is an Aboriginal Australian Artist. Her painting Seven Sisters won the 2019 Wynne Prize awarded by the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ken Sisters</span> Indigenous Australian art collective

The Ken Sisters also known as the Ken Family Collaborative or Ken Sisters Collaborative are a collective of award-winning Pitjantjatjara artists from the Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Lands of northern South Australia.

Betty Muffler is an Aboriginal Australian artist and ngangkari (healer). She is a senior artist at Iwantja Arts, in Indulkana in Aṉangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara, South Australia, known for a series of works on large linen canvases called Ngangkari Ngura .

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Ananguku Arts, ed. (2010). Tjukurpa Pulkatjara: The Power of the Law. Wakefield Press. p. 66. ISBN   9781862548909.
  2. 1 2 Kohen, Apolline (31 March 2011). "The Stories of the Elders". Australian Art Review. Australian Art & Leisure Media Pty Ltd.
  3. 1 2 3 4 "Details of Tjungkara Ken". Short Street Gallery. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  4. "Room brochure" (PDF). 27th National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award . Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory. 2010. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  5. Boland, Michaela (20 April 2012). "Storage laws force collectors to soft-sell". The Australian.
  6. "Desert Country competition winner". E-News. Art Gallery of South Australia. 2011. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  7. "Art Gallery of South Australia, Until 26 January 2011". Desart. Desart Incorporated; Association of Central Australian Aboriginal Art & Craft Centres. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  8. Walker, Wendy (19 November 2010). "Joining the dots on desert movement". The Australian.
  9. "Tjungkara Ken". National Gallery of Victoria. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  10. "Desert Country: Art Gallery of South Australia travelling exhibition". Exhibitions. Newcastle Art Gallery. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  11. "Amata painters". Exhibitions. Queensland Art Gallery of Modern Art. 2012. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  12. "Ken, Tjungkara". Collection Online. National Gallery of Australia. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  13. "Prizes: Archibald Prize 2017: Tjungkara Ken". Art Gallery of NSW . 2017. Retrieved 15 November 2020.
  14. Knowles, Rachael (15 June 2021). "Story of the stars shines the brightest". National Indigenous Times. Retrieved 27 June 2021.
  15. "Our Art Centre". Tjala Arts. Retrieved 16 March 2020.