Tjuvholene Crags

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The Tjuvholene Crags ( 71°57′S4°28′E / 71.950°S 4.467°E / -71.950; 4.467 Coordinates: 71°57′S4°28′E / 71.950°S 4.467°E / -71.950; 4.467 ) are a series of high rock crags measuring at 2,495 m at sea level, which form the northern end of Mount Grytoyr in the Muhlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Mapped from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60), the formation was named Tjuvholene (the thief's lair).

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