To (kana)

Last updated
to
hiragana
Japanese Hiragana kyokashotai TO.svg
katakana
Japanese Katakana kyokashotai TO.svg
transliteration to
translit. with dakuten do
hiragana origin
katakana origin
Man'yōgana 刀 土 斗 度 戸 利 速 止 等 登 澄 得 騰 十 鳥 常 跡
Voiced Man'yōgana土 度 渡 奴 怒 特 藤 騰 等 耐 抒 杼
spelling kana 東京のト
(Tōkyō no "to")
unicode U+3068, U+30C8
braille Braille T.svg
Note: These Man'yōgana originally represented syllables with one of two different vowel sounds, which merged in later pronunciation

, in hiragana, or in katakana, is one of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora. Both represent the sound [to], and when written with dakuten represent the sound [do]. In the Ainu language, the katakana ト can be written with a handakuten (which can be entered in a computer as either one character (ト゚) or two combined characters (ト゜) to represent the sound [tu], and is interchangeable with the katakana ツ゚.

Contents

Form Rōmaji Hiragana Katakana
Normal t-
(た行 ta-gyō)
to
tou
too
とう
とお, とぉ
とー
トウ
トオ, トォ
トー
Addition dakuten d-
(だ行 da-gyō)
do
dou
doo
どう
どお, どぉ
どー
ドウ
ドオ, ドォ
ドー
Other additional forms
Form A (tw-)
Romaji Hiragana Katakana
twaとぁ, とゎトァ, トヮ
twiとぃトィ
tu, twuとぅトゥ
tweとぇトェ
twoとぅぉトゥォ
Form B (dw-)
Romaji Hiragana Katakana
dwaどぁ, どゎドァ, ドヮ
dwiどぃドィ
du, dwuどぅドゥ
dweどぇドェ
dwoどぅぉドゥォ

Stroke order

Stroke order in writing to Hiragana to stroke order animation.gif
Stroke order in writing と
Stroke order in writing to Katakana to stroke order animation.gif
Stroke order in writing ト
Stroke order in writing to to-bw.png
Stroke order in writing と
Stroke order in writing to to-bw.png
Stroke order in writing ト

The Katakana ト is made from two strokes:

  1. A vertical stroke on in the center;
  2. A line pointing downwards towards the right.

Other communicative representations

Japanese radiotelephony alphabet Wabun code
東京のト
Tōkyō no "To"
Loudspeaker.svg        
IJN pennant To.svg

Japanese Semaphore Basic Stroke 2.svg Japanese Semaphore Basic Stroke 5.svg

To-jsl-yubimoji.png Japanese To Braille.svg
Japanese Navy Signal Flag Japanese semaphore Japanese manual syllabary (fingerspelling) Braille dots-2345
Japanese Braille
と / ト in Japanese Braille
と / ト
to
ど / ド
do
とう / トー
/tou
どう / ドー
/dou
Other kana based on Braille
ちょ / チョ
cho
ぢょ / ヂョ
jo/dyo
ちょう / チョー
chō
ぢょう / ヂョー
/dyō
Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese Dakuten Braille.svg Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese Choon Braille.svg Japanese Dakuten Braille.svg Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese Choon Braille.svg Japanese -Y- Braille.svg Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese YoonDakuten Braille.svg Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese -Y- Braille.svg Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese Choon Braille.svg Japanese YoonDakuten Braille.svg Japanese To Braille.svg Japanese Choon Braille.svg
Character information
Preview
Unicode nameHIRAGANA LETTER TOKATAKANA LETTER TOHALFWIDTH KATAKANA LETTER TOCIRCLED KATAKANA TO
Encodingsdecimalhexdechexdechexdechex
Unicode 12392U+306812488U+30C865412U+FF8413027U+32E3
UTF-8 227 129 168E3 81 A8227 131 136E3 83 88239 190 132EF BE 84227 139 163E3 8B A3
Numeric character reference ととトトトト㋣㋣
Shift JIS [1] 130 19882 C6131 10383 67196C4
EUC-JP [2] 164 200A4 C8165 200A5 C8142 1968E C4
GB 18030 [3] 164 200A4 C8165 200A5 C8132 49 153 5084 31 99 32
EUC-KR [4] / UHC [5] 170 200AA C8171 200AB C8
Big5 (non-ETEN kana) [6] 198 204C6 CC199 96C7 60
Big5 (ETEN / HKSCS) [7] 199 79C7 4F199 196C7 C4
Character information
Preview
Unicode nameKATAKANA LETTER SMALL TOHIRAGANA LETTER DOKATAKANA LETTER DOKATAKANA LETTER AINU TO [8]
Encodingsdecimalhexdechexdechexdechex
Unicode 12787U+31F312393U+306912489U+30C912488 12442U+30C8+309A
UTF-8 227 135 179E3 87 B3227 129 169E3 81 A9227 131 137E3 83 89227 131 136 227 130 154E3 83 88 E3 82 9A
Numeric character reference ㇳㇳどどドドト゚ト゚
Shift JIS (plain) [1] 130 19982 C7131 10483 68
Shift JIS-2004 [9] 131 23983 EF130 19982 C7131 10483 68131 15883 9E
EUC-JP (plain) [2] 164 201A4 C9165 201A5 C9
EUC-JIS-2004 [10] 166 241A6 F1164 201A4 C9165 201A5 C9165 254A5 FE
GB 18030 [3] 129 57 188 5581 39 BC 37164 201A4 C9165 201A5 C9
EUC-KR [4] / UHC [5] 170 201AA C9171 201AB C9
Big5 (non-ETEN kana) [6] 198 205C6 CD199 97C7 61
Big5 (ETEN / HKSCS) [7] 199 80C7 50199 197C7 C5

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References

  1. 1 2 Unicode Consortium (2015-12-02) [1994-03-08]. "Shift-JIS to Unicode".
  2. 1 2 Unicode Consortium; IBM. "EUC-JP-2007". International Components for Unicode .
  3. 1 2 Standardization Administration of China (SAC) (2005-11-18). GB 18030-2005: Information Technology—Chinese coded character set.
  4. 1 2 Unicode Consortium; IBM. "IBM-970". International Components for Unicode .
  5. 1 2 Steele, Shawn (2000). "cp949 to Unicode table". Microsoft / Unicode Consortium.
  6. 1 2 Unicode Consortium (2015-12-02) [1994-02-11]. "BIG5 to Unicode table (complete)".
  7. 1 2 van Kesteren, Anne. "big5". Encoding Standard. WHATWG.
  8. Unicode Consortium. "Unicode Named Character Sequences". Unicode Character Database.
  9. Project X0213 (2009-05-03). "Shift_JIS-2004 (JIS X 0213:2004 Appendix 1) vs Unicode mapping table".
  10. Project X0213 (2009-05-03). "EUC-JIS-2004 (JIS X 0213:2004 Appendix 3) vs Unicode mapping table".