To Ngoc Van (crater)

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To Ngoc Van
To Ngoc Van crater MESSENGER WAC IGF to RGB.jpg
Central pit feature of To Ngoc Van crater by MESSENGER in approximate color
Planet Mercury
Coordinates 52°29′N111°42′W / 52.49°N 111.7°W / 52.49; -111.7
Quadrangle Shakespeare
Diameter 71 km (44 mi)
Eponym To Ngoc Van [1]
Another MESSENGER image To Ngoc Van crater MESSENGER WAC IGF to RGB 2.jpg
Another MESSENGER image

To Ngoc Van is a pit-floored crater on Mercury, named after the Vietnamese artist Tô Ngọc Vân. [1] It was discovered in January 2008 during the first flyby of the planet by MESSENGER spacecraft. [2] Its floor displays an irregularly shaped collapse feature, which is called a central pit. The size of the pit is 21 × 10 km. [2] Such a feature may have resulted from collapse of a magma chamber underlying the central part of the crater. The collapse feature is an analog of Earth's volcanic calderas. [2]

To the southeast of To Ngoc Van is Bruegel crater, and to the northwest is Burns.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature: To Ngoc Van". USGS . Retrieved 7 March 2021.
  2. 1 2 3 Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Blewett, David T.; Gaskell, Robert W.; Denevi, Brett W.; Robinson, Mark S.; Strom, Robert G.; Solomon, Sean C.; Sprague, Ann L. (2009). "Pit-floor craters on Mercury: Evidence of near-surface igneous activity". Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 285 (3–4): 243–250. Bibcode:2009E&PSL.285..243G. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2009.05.023. See unnamed crater 1.