Tobias Bernhoft

Last updated

Tobias Brodtkorp Bernhoft (5 December 1869 – 20 August 1936) was a Norwegian engineer and director.

He was born on 5 December 1869 to Tobias Bernhoft senior (1841-1872) and his wife Thora (1848-1910) at Strinda. [1] He married Marie Holmboe on 30 September 1896, with whom he had four children. [2] Among them was the famous singer Bias Bernhoft. [3]

Bernhoft studied at Kristiania tekniske skole ("Kristiania School of Technics") from 1889 to 1891. In the same year as he left the school, Bernhoft was hired by the Norwegian State Railways. He became the engineer of the constructions of the Gjøvik, Bergen, Roa-Hønefoss, Rauma and Solør Lines. In 1911, Bernhoft was appointed chief engineer of the Dovre Line. Bernhoft became the managing director of Holmenkolbanen in 1914, succeeding Finn Sejersted. [1]

Tobias Bernhoft was admitted into the exclusive skiing-based social club SK Ull in 1889. [4] He died on 20 August 1936, aged 68. [1] After Bernhoft's death, Olav Braarud became managing director. [5]

Related Research Articles

Ellef Ringnes

Ellef Ringnes was a Norwegian brewer and patron.

Common Tunnel

The Common Tunnel, sometimes called the Common Line, is a 7.3-kilometer (4.5 mi) long tunnel of the Oslo Metro which runs through the city center of Oslo, Norway. The name derives from the fact that all six lines of the metro use the tunnel, which runs from Majorstuen to Tøyen. The section has six stations, including the four busiest on the metro.

Egil Werner Erichsen was a Norwegian corporate director and politician for the Conservative Party.

Henrik Groth

Henrik Johan Florentz Groth was a Norwegian publisher and essayist, who was managing director of the Cappelen publishing company from 1947 to 1973.

Tobias Brodtkorb "Bias" Bernhoft was a Norwegian singer and revue writer.

Finn Sejersted

Finn Sejersted was a Norwegian director and railway engineer.

Olav Braarud was a Norwegian director and engineer.

Edvard Heiberg was a Norwegian director and engineer.


Rolv Werner Erichsen was a Norwegian newspaper editor. He was born in Holt outside Tvedestrand in Aust-Agder.

SK Ull Norwegian Nordic skiing club

Skiklubben Ull was a Norwegian Nordic skiing club based in Oslo. Founded in 1883, Skiklubben Ull attracted several skilled sportsmen who between 1883 and 1891 won six Ladies' Cups and one King's Cup in national skiing events. The sporting facilities belonging the club were located in Vestre Aker, with the ski jumping hill Ullbakken near Frognerseteren being opened in 1884. The prestigious Husebyrennet was staged there once. Members of SK Ull were later instrumental in moving this prestigious contest to the hill Holmenkollbakken.

Andreas Brandrud Norwegian church historian

Andreas Brandrud was a Norwegian professor, theologian and church historian.

Ulrik Fredrik Lange Lyng (1868–1948) was a Norwegian judge.

Karl Roll

Karl Nikolai Roll was a Norwegian sports official, skier and military officer.

Johan Tidemann Sverre was a Norwegian military officer and sports official.

Axel Otto Dahl was a Norwegian engineer and sportsman.

Alf Scott-Hansen was a Norwegian engineer and civil servant.

Trygve Jacobsen was a Norwegian businessperson.

Bård Annar Poulsson was a Norwegian businessperson in the insurance industry.

Hassa Horn Jr.

Hans Thomas "Hassa" Horn was a Norwegian road engineer, industrialist, sports official and politician for the Conservative Party.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Erichsen, Egil W. (1948). Holmenkolbanen gjennom 50 år (in Norwegian). Oslo: A/S Holmenkolbanen. pp. 115–16.
  2. Grindstein, Torkil. "Tobias Brodtkorp Bernhoft" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 18 January 2011.
  3. Larsen, Svend Erik Løken. "Bias Bernhoft". In Helle, Knut (ed.). Norsk biografisk leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Kunnskapsforlaget. Retrieved 18 January 2010.
  4. Vaage, Jakob (1983). Skiklubben Ull 100 år 1883–1983 (in Norwegian). Oslo. pp. 7–9.
  5. Erichsen, Egil W. (1973). Holmenkolbanen 1948–1973 (in Norwegian). A/S Holmenkolbanen. p. 29.
Business positions
Preceded by Managing director of Holmenkolbanen
1914–1934
Succeeded by