Tobin Mesa

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Tobin Mesa ( 73°17′S162°52′E / 73.283°S 162.867°E / -73.283; 162.867 Coordinates: 73°17′S162°52′E / 73.283°S 162.867°E / -73.283; 162.867 ) is a large mesa in the Mesa Range, between Pain Mesa on the north and Gair Mesa on the south. Named by the Northern Party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, for James Tobin, surveyor with this party.

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Sheehan Mesa is a prominent mesa standing 10 miles (16 km) west-northwest of Pain Mesa in the northwest part of Mesa Range, Victoria Land. Named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, for Maurice Sheehan, field assistant with this party.

Siders Bluff is a bold rock bluff that forms the northwest end of Tobin Mesa in the Mesa Range, Victoria Land. The bluff exposes an easily accessible section of Jurassic basalt. The feature was studied by Ohio State University geological parties in 1981-82 and 1982–83. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) after Mary A. Siders, geologist in those field parties.

Silva Ridge is a ridge leading to the top of Sheehan Mesa, on the northeast side. Large silicified tree stumps in place of growth were found halfway up this ridge, hence named Silva by the Northern Party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63.

Gair Mesa is the southernmost mesa of the Mesa Range, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1962–63, for H.S. Gair, geologist and leader of this party. This geographical feature lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Exposure Hill is a low hill at the southwest end of Gair Mesa, in the Mesa Range, Victoria Land, Antarctica. This topographical feature was so named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1962–63, because the west side of the hill has a noteworthy exposure of light colored sandstone. The hill lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Haban Spur is a bold rock spur 3 miles (5 km) north of Scarab Peak, extending northeast from the east central part of Tobin Mesa in the Mesa Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. The feature was geologically studied by an Ohio State University field party during the 1982–83 season, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Marta A. Haban, a geologist in the party. The feature lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Alpha Bluff is a high bluff on the west side of Shults Peninsula, at the east side of Skelton Glacier in Antarctica. Surveyed and named in 1957 by the New Zealand party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58). Named after the first letter of the Greek alphabet because it is the most southerly of all bluffs on the Skelton Glacier.

Cherry Spur is a prominent rock spur that forms the southwest portion of Sculpture Mountain at the southern end of the Monument Nunataks, Victoria Land, Antarctica. The feature was geologically studied by Ohio State University field parties in the 1981–82 and 1982–83 seasons, and named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names after Eric M. Cherry, geologist with those parties who worked on the spur. The spur lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Jigsaw Rock Gut is a prominent gully 0.5 nautical miles (1 km) west of Margaret Hill on Rücker Ridge, in the Royal Society Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named by the New Zealand Geographic Board in 1994 following work in the area by a New Zealand Geological Survey field party, 1977–78. Intense and intricate folds interlock like a jigsaw puzzle in the marble wall forming the eastern side of this gully, suggesting the name.

Mount Frustum is a large pyramidal shaped table mountain, 3,100 metres (10,200 ft) high, standing between Mount Fazio and Scarab Peak in the southern part of Tobin Mesa, in Victoria Land, Antarctica. The topographical feature was so named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1962–63, for its frustum-like shape. The mountain lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Frio Peak is a peak 2,606 metres (8,550 ft) high located 1.5 nautical miles (3 km) east of Salient Peak on Salient Ridge, in the Royal Society Range, Victoria Land, Antarctica. The name was suggested by K. Brodie, a member of R.H. Findlay's New Zealand Antarctic Research Program field party, 1979–80. "Frio" is a Spanish word for cold and commemorates work conducted in the area in 1979 in piercing cold wind.

Descent Glacier is a short, steep glacier between Briggs Hill and Condit Glacier, flowing northwest from Descent Pass into Ferrar Glacier, in Victoria Land. It was so named because of the adventurous descent made here by the party led by Albert Armitage of the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04. The name seems to have been first used on maps of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13.

Pinnacle Gap is a gap between Pain and Tobin Mesas in the Mesa Range of Victoria Land. The feature was traversed and so named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, because it is readily identified by the high rock pinnacle on the north ridge overlooking the gap.

Pain Mesa is a large mesa just north of Tobin Mesa in the Mesa Range, Victoria Land. Named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, for Kevin Pain, deputy leader of this party.

Mount Essinger is a peak rising to 1,905 metres (6,250 ft), surmounting the most eastern massif of the Cathedral Rocks in the Royal Society Range, in Victoria Land. It was named in 1992 by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in association with Chaplains Tableland after Lieutenant Commander Jesse W. Essinger, a U.S. Navy chaplain with the 1968 winter party at McMurdo Station.

Mount Fazio is an ice-free mountain, 2,670 metres (8,760 ft) high, marking the southwest end of Tobin Mesa, in the Mesa Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica. This topographical feature was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–64, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for William V. Fazio, U.S. Navy, a helicopter crewmember during U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze, 1966, 1967 and 1968. The mountain lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

The Mesa Range is a range of flat-topped mesas comprising the Sheehan, Pain, Tobin and Gair Mesas, situated at the head of the Rennick Glacier in Victoria Land, Antarctica. it was given this descriptive name by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition of 1962–63.

Mount Mignone is a peak in the Cathedral Rocks, Royal Society Range, rising to 2,025 metres (6,640 ft) between Darkowski Glacier and Bol Glacier in Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was named in 1992 by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in association with Chaplains Tableland after Lieutenant John C. Mignone, U.S. Navy, chaplain with the 1966 winter party at McMurdo Station.

Scarab Peak is a prominent peak, 3,160 m, located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northeast of Mount Frustum in the southeast end of Tobin Mesa, the Mesa Range, Victoria Land. Named by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, for its resemblance to a scarab beetle.

Veto Gap is a gap between Tobin and Gair Mesas in the Mesa Range of Victoria Land, Antarctica which provides access from upper Rennick Glacier to the Aeronaut Glacier. It was named "Veto" by the northern party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, because it decided that Pinnacle Gap to the north offered the better route from Rennick to Aviator Glacier.